7 Months!

Comments

Barbara Rasmussen 3 years, 7 months ago

Heard on the news tonight that the lady who helped the escaped prisoners and their accomplice was sentenced to 7 months in jail. Seems she got off pretty light considering that the escapees killed a couple of people in New Mexico. So is our justice system broken? I would've thought that aiding and abetting criminals carried a much heftier sentence. What do you think?

0

Michael Alexander 3 years, 7 months ago

There were two women involved, Barbara... one who visited them regularly and then went with them on their rampage. The second was a local Jake's Corner woman, the mother of one of the escapees. Apparently, all she was charged with was harboring. Do you know which one the news was talking about...? I can't find anything on-line this morning...

0

Barbara Rasmussen 3 years, 7 months ago

The one from Jakes Corner. She was arrested on charges of conspiracy to facilitate escape and hindering prosecution. Exactly what she was found guilty of I do not know. Just seems the sentence was light.

0

Michael Alexander 3 years, 7 months ago

OK, that's what I figured. It does seem like 7 months is little more than a slap on the wrist. The way I understand it, she sent her son money after the escape, so she knew what she was doing. But I'm thinking that the court may have taken her "special circumstances" into account - motherhood.

Now, I've never been a mother (or a father), but I do have a dog that I helped raise from a puppy, and I love that little dog more than life itself. Just based on that relationship, something tells me that, were I in her shoes, I would have done whatever I could to help, protect and defend a kid of mine, no matter what the charges were, no matter the personal consequence.

I'll just bet the judge is a parent, too.

0

Tom Garrett 3 years, 7 months ago

Could be there's more to it than meets the eye at first. She may also have had to agree to testify to certain facts at trial, facts that will close the loop around the killers.

But I agree with you folks. What I would do if one of my kids was trying to evade the law I don;t know, but if I could get away with it without it hurting Lolly, and if there were any kind of promise that they would go straight, I would be sorely tempted, I can tell you.

And while I am sure as hell not for bleeding heart judges I just as surely am for clemency when it serves no purpose to punish someone beyond a reasonable point, and this looks like a cse in point.

What the hey! We're all human.

0

Tom Garrett 3 years, 7 months ago

Let's take a small poll. You don't have to answer if you don't want to.

If your son or daughter were involved in something illegal, got caught, swore to you that he or she would go straight if only this charge would go away, would you feel a strong urge to help?

I'll start the answers. Put me down for a yes.

0

Barbara Rasmussen 3 years, 7 months ago

Depends on the crime. Murder or crimes against children would be hard to accept. But I don't think that either of these charges would or could go away no matter what they would swear to. I always think about the parents of the people who do commit serious crimes and wonder what they must be going through. I even thought of the young man's parents from this weekends horrible incident in Tucson.

0

Dan Haapala 3 years, 7 months ago

This is not an issue/question that should be hard to answer. A child/sibling/parent/close relative that get's arrested should have all the support a family can emotionally give; However, Wrong is Wrong and Right is Right. There is no in between, no excuses. When you break the law you have divorced yourself from society. No ifs, ands, or buts. Step up and take your medicine and families should encourage the same. If they don't......they never excepted societies laws in the first place and should be considered accomplices. Too harsh?..... A child will grow to accept whatever societal requirements are made of him/her and live by them. The rules come from the parents and if the parents rules are lax the childs will also be lax. It would be nice to charge the parents but that won't happen...STiLL you can't excuse the actions of the child. Politcal correctness is involved here as well. There would seem to be a built in excuse for some transgressions against society that we are supposed to accept. You don't have to look farther than our west coast to see that notable figures in society or politics or financial influence receive a different judgement than others. We have ignored or forgotten the example of tough love. In 1976, in Phx. A brother of mine showed up at the home of another brother and myself with a new car. We learned he hadn't bought it, but had "taken it for a test drive". He was not in control of his facilities and I asked where he had gotten the car. He told me. I called the Police in the jurisdiction and asked if the vehicle had been reported stolen and they said yes. I told them my brother had taken it, it was not damaged, and I would be driving it back to the dealer and would they meet me there. They agreed. The dealer dropped the charges, though we hadn't asked them to, the police asked about my brother and he had agreed to check into the mental health clinic for help. He did. I should point out that I have not seen that brother since. Did he continue to have problems, yes. Do I feel bad about turning him in, NO! Had that brother shot someone in an alley and stolen their money, my reaction would have been no different. We are all....I RePEAT all...responsible for our own actions and those who don't expose our misdeeds with the hope of helping to correct them.....are as guilty as us. The best help we can give those we love is to have them stand up and accept their personal responsibility....anything less.......is failure.

0

Tom Garrett 3 years, 7 months ago

Barb,

I put you down for a "yes."

"I always think about the parents of the people who do commit serious crimes and wonder what they must be going through."

And so do we all, I suspect.

"Do I feel bad about turning him in, NO!"

Doggone right! You should feel proud of yourself! You didn't just do the right thing, you did the hard one. Glad it worked out.

By the way, take note that what I asked was, "...would you feel a strong urge to help?"

Dan, what you did goes under the "yes" column, since what you did was help your brother. Many people would have just turned their backs, justifying it with the same old saw, "It's not my problem." Or with, "I don't want to get involved."

I don't often wax Biblical, but I think I may remember something in there about being "your brother's keeper."

0

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.