Roll your own cigarettes

Comments

Bernice Winandy 2 years, 4 months ago

It;s me again with another AZ Repubic article, " Ariz. stores feel pinch of 'roll your own' rule." Seems that stores had popped up where you could buy loose tabacco and then provided a machine where you could roll your own cigarettes. New federal regulations, apparently backed by the tabacco industry, have classified these stores as manufacturers. Since these stores cannot meet the new federal guidelines many are going out of business. I know many of you will say this is another example of federal interference. But, that is not the object of my story.

During WWII, my dad made his own cigarettes. He had an appliance that was about 4 inches by 6 inches in the center was a round hump. The contraption also had a handle that he would push over the hump. If I remember correctly, he would put a cigarette paper down on one side of this hump, fill it with tabacco pull the handle over the hump and out came a rolled cigarette. Does anyone else remember such a contraption. What advantage did my dad's operation have over the cowboy, hold the paper in your hand, fill with tabacco roll, lick and smoke?

I don't remember what happened to the contraption, I just remember sitting in the kitchen in fascination as he rolled his cigarette. Yes, his cause of death was cancer.

0

Tom Garrett 2 years, 4 months ago

Yes, Bernice, I've seen one of those. Belonged to my older brother, Bill.

The advantages were: Far cheaper (at a time when cigarettes were 11¢ a pack, far faster, and rolled a firm, well shaped cigarette. Ever seen a hand rolled cigarette? It looks like a thin white sausage with pointy ends.

Bill also had a round, dome shaped metal humidifier that had slots in concentric circular rows that all went around its perimeter and inward, but stopped just short of the center, where there was a small, porous stone that held a few drops of water. He showed me how to use it (I was about nine), and I used to make cigarettes for him.

In those days a buck was a buck. Our rent, in New York City, for a nice house with a large terraced back yard, was just $16. For 10¢ you could buy a piece of American cheese large enough to make macaroni and cheese for four people for two days, a chocolate bar larger by half that today's Hershey bar cost 1¢, and an afternoon double feature at the movie house cost 2¢.

I have no comment on governmental regulations other than what Thomas Jefferson once said.

"The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time, with the blood of patriots and tyrants. It is its natural manure."

0

Tom Garrett 2 years, 4 months ago

Bernice,

Was this "device" more or less flat? Or was it kind of rounded?

There were two kinds of them.

0

Bernice Winandy 2 years, 4 months ago

As I remember it, it was flat on the ends and round in the middle

0

Pam Mason 2 years, 4 months ago

Roll your own. I remember that you could also insert a filter at one end.

0

Tom Garrett 2 years, 4 months ago

Thanks, Bernice.

Pam, that must have come a lot later than the one I saw, though it would probably work even back then. The only trouble is that there was only one brand of (low-selling) filter cigarettes--Raleighs.

Do they still make those?

By the way, want to make a real filter cigarette? Take an ordinary cigarette and put it in through an electric spark. Run it back and forth from end to end just once. (I used to have a device in my classroom that delivered sparks like that; made it from an old Model-T coil and a vibrator.) What happens is that the cigarette is perforated with tiny, invisible holes. You can drag on it until your lungs explode. but cannot get more than a trace of smoke along with the air coming in through the tobacco. It still tastes like a cigarette because all the air passes through tobacco and picks up the flavor. I did that to a whole pack that a friend left laying around. He smoked and smoked n those things, and then broke me up by saying, "You know something? I'm think I'm going to quit. I don't get anything out of these things anymore." Who says science isn't fun? :-)

0

Requires free registration

Posting comments requires a free account and verification.