Could this explain our dead elk?

Comments

Tom Garrett 1 year, 5 months ago

Where? Williamsburg, Kentucky.

Who? Two workers wheeling a garbage can inside from the back of a restaurant.

Witness? Katie Hopkins, a customer of the restaurant, says, "Two of the workers came in wheeling a garbage can and they had a box sitting on top of it. And hanging out of the garbage can, they were trying to be real quick with it. So that nobody could see it. But there was like a tail, and a foot and leg. Sticking out of the garbage can and they wheeled it straight back into the kitchen."

And then? Hopkins, who described a scene that left a trail of blood across the floor as "very disturbing," called the health department immediately.

And then? Environmental health inspector, Paul Lawson, arrived at the Chinese restaurant after the complaint to find a dead deer in the restaurant's kitchen.

Uh-oh!

When questioned, the owner's son admitted he picked up the deer by the side of I-75 north. He did say say how the deer happened to be there, and the article makes no mention of how the deer died.

The restaurant will not face any fines. In fact, they are closed at the moment but will be able to reopen if they pass a secondary health inspection.

Tell me the truth now, can you predict what I am going to say next? . . . . . . . The restaurant owner says he was going to serve the deer to his family, not to his customers.

Final thought? What if one of our friends and neighbors, one of those who who are so angry about the elk eating up their gardens, has been having thoughts about poetic justice?

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 5 months ago

I put this string up in fun, of course, but thinking about it again when I saw the title today I wondered what would happen if someone were to go out along a highway and pick up some poor animal that had been killed?

I know that "roadkill" doesn't sound very appetizing, but that's because of the image it dredges up in our minds--a large greasy spot in the road with a crow hopping around and pecking away at it. But what if someone saw a elk or deer killed and decided it was not right to waste good food. What would happen?

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Pat Randall 1 year, 5 months ago

If you hit an animal, call Game and Fish. Sometimes you can keep the animal or it will be turned over to a homeless shelter. That is the way it was a while back. Laws are changed so often that we don't hear about so don't know if that is still true. However if you hit someone's cattle, you pay them for it and they keep the meat. This is an open range state.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 5 months ago

"Sometimes you can keep the animal or it will be turned over to a homeless shelter."

That's interesting. I'm glad it doesn't go to waste.

"However if you hit someone's cattle, you pay them for it and they keep the meat. This is an open range state."

That is the most ridiculous law I have ever heard. It's an obvious violation of the Fifth Amendment. If it ever happens to me I'll have the ACLU on the phone before I even report the accident. I'm sure they'd love to take the case.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 5 months ago

Tom, Have at it. You will pay for the cattle you killed or injured so bad they had to be killed. Arizona has always been an open range state. If you don't want cattle in your yard, you have to fence them out. How ever over the years the cattle men built fences to keep track of thier cattle, and stop cattle thieves. Since there aren't many cattle ranches left not much to worry about hitting any. How about all the wild horses running loose on the Saguaro Lake cut off road. The state is supposed to keep them fenced in. One day about 20 ran in front of me, as they had broken down the fence. Called the highway dept. and told them. I was told to call Game and Fish. I told them if they wanted them called they could do it. The horses were running loose on the highway and someone was going to have a wreck and maybe killed. The fence is still down and that has been about a year ago. Why the state thinks we need wild horses running around is a mystery to me. When there isn't feed growing wild they buy hay for them and spread it around the state. There are wild jackasses at Lake Havasu City running loose and they are also protected and fed by the state. How about the starving homeless kids???

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 5 months ago

" Why the state thinks we need wild horses running around is a mystery to me."

Me too.

"When there isn't feed growing wild they buy hay for them and spread it around the state."

That's just plain stupid. The number of any animal in the wild can be taken care of by nature, and that's the way it should be.

It's not like horses are native to North America. They aren't they came in the with Spaniards. What would the state do if we had wild dog packs running around? Same thing.

"There are wild jackasses at Lake Havasu City running loose and they are also protected and fed by the state."

I just do not understand that kind of thing. In the first place, both the horses and the jackasses compete with the native wild animals.

"How about the starving homeless kids???"

Maybe they can let them run free and toss out some hay for them too. It would make about as much sense.

I love animals. Always have. But when we create a problem ourselves the answer is not to keep on doing.

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