Some more marathon stuff

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Tom Garrett 2 years, 1 month ago

I had to save this until after the election was over for obvious reasons, but I knew you'd enjoy reading it.

Thirty-seven year-old Olok Nykew of St. Paul, Minnesota registered for the Sioux Falls Marathon. He crossed the finish line first.

Good for him! He shattered the race record by an incredible 25 minutes.

However, after checking some things, race officials declared his run null and void. Why? Because he did not make the whole run.

Well, that's nothing new; just last year a marathon a runner in London hopped on a bus and put in a great time. And back in 1980 in Boston, you may remember, Rosie Ruiz took the subway on the way to her Marathon victory, which didn't stay a victory for very long.

But thirty-seven year-old Olok Nykew outdid both of them. As the race wound its way back and forth in South Dakota's largest city, it occasionally overlapped itself for a block or so.

So....

Nykew only ran half the race.

Nykew says it was an honest mistake

"Maybe I'm lost, I don't know," he says. "I thought what is this? When I got there I thought it was not long enough. I'm thinking I'm not cheating. I was just confused. It was an honest mistake."

Officials say that chip-timing technology has made it nearly impossible to take a shortcut without getting caught.

Check this number:

At the 2009 Chicago Marathon, 252 runners were disqualified for not running the full course.

Think about that. What does it say?

  1. If that means that 252 people tried to cheat it says a lot about people.

  2. But is that really what it means? And if not, what else might it mean?

Think hard now!

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