A ridiculous Walmart policy!

Comments

Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

A friend of mine came back from Walmart on Saturday, but had nothing from Walmart. Everything was from Bashas and Safeway.

Why?

After waiting almost 30 minutes in line behind some clown with a entire cart of nothing but "price matches," my friend left an almost full cart in line and went elsewhere.

Price matches, where Walmart will match the price of any local sale is a nice policy. It does slow down a line occasionally because the checker has to verify the sale price in the paper flyers at the register, but--well--that's life.

But my friend walked out for a VERY good reason.

Is there a Albertson's or a Fry's in Payson?

No?

Then why should we stand in line while some clown demands that the PAYSON Walmart match their prices. Tell the jerk to go down to the valley and shop in those stores if he likes them so much!

Or else!

What's the or else?

Take a guess.

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Bernice Winandy 1 year, 3 months ago

I thought Walmart only matched the prices of the local stores, i.e. Bashas and Safeway.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

Not so, Bernice. That's exactly what I thought. But apparently they match prices from anywhere. Don't ask me where they get the flyers that they check. I myself have been in line behind people who have held up the line for some time using price matches, but I never complianed because I assumed they were local price matches--fair enough.

You want to hear a loud noise in Walmart? Let me get behind someone who is asking for a price match from a valley store. I guarantee you it will be the last time I ever set foot in Walmart. That is not right, and that's all there is to it.

What, after all, is the logic of price matches? To encourage people who would otherwise shop at the other store to shop in your store. But who up here is going to shop at a Fry's or Alrbertson's in the valley? No one! I am not standing in line behind someone who is taking advantage of the system. I'll just leave the cart, walk out, and stay gone.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

I shop at Walmart's because thier prices are less than at the other two stores without signing up for a card that so they can sell my name, address and anything else that is required on it. The information is sold then I get more junk mail. $1.50 difference in a can of International brand flavored coffee is quite a bit. The last time I shopped at Safeway was about 5 years ago. I always get my fresh vegetables last so they won't get mashed. I had some broccoli ready to put in my full basket. The price was in big letters then under neath was a price 50 cents a lb. more if you didn't have a card. I pushed my basket to the front of the store, found an employee and told him someone would have to put my basket full of things back as I would not pay 50 cents more because I didn't have a card. I get irritated at Walmart not because of them but the shoppers that never have cash, but a handful of coupons, food stamps, a check or credit card or all of them. All of which takes up time. I waited one day for a woman to put her credit card thru 4 times and it was rejected. Then she told the cashier she had to call her husband because there was some mistake. I would have left the line but there were people behind me and I couldn't move. I get my cash at the bank, put my purchases on the counter, pay for them and get the h--- out of the next persons way. I have waited while someone uses a credit card for less than $5.00.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

Pat, we all have problems in shopping lines, but they're just a result of the way things are. I'm not more of a saint than anyone else, but I do my best to be patient. However, this is different; this is people who price shop taking advantage of a policy, the store going along with it, and the steady customers suffering for it.

The policy should be that Walmart will price match any LOCAL sale?

Anybody disagree with that?

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Bernice Winandy 1 year, 3 months ago

I think that is a reasonable suggestion for a reasonable policy.

I don't think we should get into any trouble in this string. :-)

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Rex Hinshaw 1 year, 3 months ago

What if you are purchasing something at Walmart that is not available at any other store here in Payson ? For example,some brands of a/v or computer equipment...certain types of hunting or fishing gear...etc. Does the price match only work for food items,or does it apply to everything? If it applies to everything....then why not compare to out of town retailers.

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Kim Chittick 1 year, 3 months ago

Sorry, I agree with Rex. If they are going to price match, it needs to apply to everything and to retailers in the valley as well as local. There are many of us who make a weekly, bi-monthly or monthly run to the valley: Costco, Sam's Club, Albertson, Fry's, Best Buy, Ikea, Nordstrom's, Dillards, Macy's, to name a few stops.

I do try to be considerate, but if someone has a full basket of groceries, get in a different line.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

Some times all the lines have full baskets. The problem. Not enought cashiers and because we are a small town the customers want to gossip with the ones that are trying to check out people.

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Ronald Hamric 1 year, 3 months ago

We will beat ANYBODY'S price, Anytime. Unless they make that statement more specific, as Tom suggests, then it seems to me that "anybody" means just what it says. After reading the responses on this thread, I sense the problem is not with WalMart's policy of price matching, it is more about how long it takes to get through a checkout line in that store whatever the reason. Now on that issue I have plenty of thoughts. I agree with Pat, they have numerous checkout lines but usually half are not open. It shouldn't take longer to check out and pay for your goods than it took you to do your shopping. One of the things I really appreciate about Home Depot is their "Self Check-out" stations.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

Difficult issue. I learned a bit reading your comments. There are good points on both sides of "ANYBODY'S" price.

Okay, let's analyze the problem and come up with a fair and proper solution.

First the issues:

• Walmart wants more business, created a policy to get it, and directly benefits from it.

• A few people benefit from the policy; most do not.

• Those who benefit shouid bear any inconvenience the policy creates.

• Those who do not directly benefit from it shouid not bear the inconvenience it creates.

• The solution is plain. Put up a large sign.

"All price matches and coupons must be redeemed in this line."

All other lines should have a different sign.

"Sorry, for price matches or coupons, please go to Line 6."

That is simple, workable, easily doable, and would not require additional lines to be opened because there are always some shoppers with coupons or a list of price matches. Everyone would win. The customers with price matches could enjoy them. The customers who do not want to stand in line behind someone who takes longer than normal could be in and out faster. Walmart would gain PR by showing that it responds to the wishes of the public. Everyone wins; no one loses.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

Some Walmart stores in Mesa have self check-out lanes. Did you know that the corner Walmart's that only sell regular grocery items in Mesa have higher prices than the large Walmarts like we have here in Payson? Found this out when my husband was in a home in Mesa. We have a Walmart near our house in Mesa so I shop there. One day I ask why a pie was 50 cents higher than what I paid for it here. Was told it was because we had the Big Box store that sells a little bit of everything, like clothes, toys, garden supplies etc. Go figure, it has to be hauled up here.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

Ron,

I plan to cast my vote in two places. One on the Walmart site, and the other with the store manager.

And thanks for the vote of confidence. I think what happened here was I had a gripe, some people showed me that I wasn't entirely right and that there were other things to consider, I thought about that and realized how true it was, and the minute I did that a solution popped up.

I hope Walmart gives it some thought. It could help them, and it sure as hey would change something that annoys their customers.

Thanks again.

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Kim Chittick 1 year, 3 months ago

Truly, their computers could alleviate this entire problem, however, WalMart has changed things a bit (they do that far too often!!). If they are going to promise "lowest prices", then they should just input all of the sale prices from all of the other stores, and eliminate all of this nonsensical "price matching" per item. Each store has people whose sole job is to keep all of the computer codes and "sku's currently priced. Any time there is a problem or discrepancy, the register computer "tags" the sale, and a report is generated at the end of the day with each of the "tags" noted. The computer person then is detailed with correcting the problem. Making price matching easier and more convenient for everybody would be such a simple matter.

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Bernice Winandy 1 year, 3 months ago

Hurray we did it -- no nasty arguments!!!! :-) Just a string with useful suggestions -- was beginning to think that wasn't possible. :-)

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

I'm for that.

With everything that's going on these days I'm glad no one suggested we station an armed guard at each entrance to Walmart with a coupon detector. :-)

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

Check for coupons, credit cards, and check books. Have then all check out in one lane when they are thru shopping. People that still know what cash is for will get the rest of the check out lanes.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

"Check for coupons, credit cards, and check books. Have then all check out in one lane when they are thru shopping."

Pat, that would put the entire store in one lane. :-)

Literally no one who shops anymore, except people who are spending under ten bucks pay in cash, and they're in a fast lane. And it is actually faster to get behind someone with a credit card than someone who has to dig around for cash, wait for change to be counted out, and stash it all away.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

Tom, Wrong ! They even pay for things under $10. with checks and credit cards in the 20 items or less lane.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

"They even pay for things under $10...."

Come to think of it that's true, at least where credit cards are concerned. I haven't noticed anyone using a check in the fast line, but I only use the fast line in Safeway. I don't like the fast lines in Walmart. No belt. That slows them down to the point where it is usually just as fast to use a regular line. I've often wondered why they did that--someone probably didn;t think it through.

I use a credit card for everything. Faster, easier, more efficient. I have the whole thing done before the checker is done. With cash nothing starts until after the checker is finished.

Besides, I like plastic money better. Easier to carry around, don't have them ugly pictures on them, and turn a wallet into a rock in case you have to drive a nail.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

What I have noticed is customers stand there gazing off into space and then when the cashier tells them the total they start digging in thier purse or pockets for the credit card or checkbook. That is what holds up the line. If I ever have to use a check I have it all written out and signed, all I have to do is write in the amount and hand it to the cashier. I use cash so I am not surpirsed when my credit card bill arrives. (:

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Kim Chittick 1 year, 3 months ago

Like Tom, I use a credit or debit card for everything; yes Pat, even purchases under $10. I hate carrying cash around; it is filthy, tests have shown that something like 75% of all cash has drug (cocaine, etc) residue on it, and it smells.

However, like Tom said, I have my card slid and all steps taken before items have all been scanned. So that by the time the cashier is done, the receipt pops out and voila!!! I am done.

Now, I do understand and totally agree with Pat's point. Today, checking out at WalMart, the woman in front of me stands there with her thumb in her...well, you get it. waits until the entire transaction is rung up, the cashier gives her the total, and then, and only then does the customer start digging in her handbag for her checkbook, then tries to use the "pen" from the card machine to fill out her check! Ooops, that isn't a pen. Then she has to dig for a pen. Fills the check out painstakingly slowly. Very slowly and deliberately tears the check from the book. Holds on to the check while she closes her checkbook and tucks it into her handbag, the tucks the pen in it's place. Finally hands the check to the cashier. That is the kind of people who make me crazy. No consideration or courtesy for other people. All of that being said though, when I find myself losing patience and tolerance, is my reminder to take a moment and thank God for my blessings and the fact that I am able to go to the grocery store and select my own groceries, and pay for them with our hard earned money, and that there are no food shortages here. It is my reminder that life is good and instead of getting short-tempered because someone is inconveniencing me, I should say a prayer for that person and whatever travails they are facing.

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Ronald Hamric 1 year, 3 months ago

Ah yes Kim, It is sooo very hard to sustain our Christian beliefs when so much of the world around us is constantly trying to draw us into it, and make us one of them. Often people tell me my faith is a bunch of hooey and I should come into the "enlightenment" of the modern world and leave all that religious bunk behind. Were I to take their advice I would be their worst nightmare. No one to answer to, no laws other than fallen man's laws which are pretty pathetic when put into practice, pretty much do what I want since one only goes around once ,and when this life is over it's lights out, nada, nothing, end of story. With that prospect, I would simply resort to "natural man" and operate via the Laws of the Jungle" where the strongest survive. There are many, many examples of those types already among us so it would be rather easy to simply blend into the forest.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

"If I ever have to use a check I have it all written out and signed, all I have to do is write in the amount and hand it to the cashier."

"No consideration or courtesy for other people."

You both hit the nail right on the head. There are some people who either don't think at all, or who don't think about other people. What really gets me is when the same person who just held up the line one way or another, then fails to push the cart out of the way, and just stands there, one foot from the end of the line, making it impossible for anyone else to get started. And the worst!? The ony who stop there to have a conversation with another one of the same.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

Ron, take some advice from Vinegar Joe Stilwell, the General in charge of the Burma campaign. His jeep flew a flag: "illigitmi non carborundum" (don't let the bas-----ds grind you down). I recently picked up a book. It's title was "The Day America Told the Truth." It's in my trash. I rarely toss a book, but I do it sometimes under the heading of destroying evil.

You know what that clown tried to do? He tried to show that Americans are (a) phonies and (b) all evil. I think there are a ot of people out there trying to do that. It probably helps them excuse what they are.

What did he do to prove his point? He asked a group of about 2,000 people some questions, telling them that the questions would never be traced back to them. Then he wrote the questions in a way that would elicit honest answers. So far, so good.

But what he did--and this had to have been planned--was to put NO timeline in the questions. So he could, for example, ask the person if her or she had ever lied. Since there isn't a human being on the planet who hasn't lied, he was able to say that everyone lies. He did the same thing with many, many questions.

Then he asked people if they had ever told a lie so as to avoid hurting someone, or for any of the reasons that we all lie now and then. His conclusion was that we all lie.

If someone were to ask you if you ever in your life struck another human being, how likely is it that you would say no? Surely everyone has at some time or other hit someone? Another kid in a fight is a likely one. A swat on the behind for a youngster is another. But this evil monster, using that kind of data, concludes that some large percentage of us hit people, and his meaning is that we do it all the time.

Then he asks questions like how often we go to a clergyman with a problem. Notice that the word "problem" is left wide open. So ask yourself that question. How many times when you have a problem do you go see a clergyman? Not many, I'll bet. He'd probably wonder why you came to him for--say--a broken arm. But this character concludes from that that our stance as a highly religious people is baloney.

The book also never bothers to ask at what age something was done, knowing full well that we all do things as kids that we would never do as adults. Again, his conclusions fail to take into account that fact, and he makes a long list of things we all do.

And he words things in such a way--for instance when asking if we have ever stolen office supplies--so that just writing down something on a notepad at work and sticking it in a pocket (the notepad and the pen not being ours) is theft of office supplies.

The book was written to make money. What it proves is that some people will do anything for money. I run into quite a few books like that. I don't have a wood fire or I'd enjoy a little winter's heat from them.

What that clown should read is the Sermon on the Mount. Maybe that would teach him something he could spread around.

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Ronald Hamric 1 year, 3 months ago

I apologize for taking the "WalMart" thread onto another topic. I know Kim personally and was simply sharing my views regarding her ultimate sense of how blessed we are to have the things we do in ths country and to Whom we owe thanks to.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 3 months ago

Ron, the subject went right where it should have gone. My comment about General Stilwell was meant to let you know that we aren't the first people who ever felt the way we do.

What I don't understand about some people where religion is concerned is this: I can easily understand that some people do not believe. That's to be expected. But there are two things I don't get.

One is why anyone should be actively hostile to Christianity. I'm talking about militant atheists. They puzzle me, and the reason they puzzle me brings up my second question. Since anyone who reads the Sermon on the Mount can readily see that all it is basically doing is telling us to treat others the way we'd like to be treated, why would anyone be opposed to it?

Ah, well. There are a lot of things I don't understand.

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Pat Randall 1 year, 3 months ago

Tom, You got one thing backwards, we do things as adults that we would have never thought of doing as kids. (:

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 2 months ago

How true. How true. We do those "adult" things

I'll never forget the time I was reading Richard Halliburton's "Royal Road to Romance" and he and a "companion" climbed the Matterhorn. As Halliburton looked out over the scene spread far below them his companion said, "At last! At last! I can do something I always wanted to do!"

And without further ado, his companion drew closer, leaned forward, and....

spit.

"I always," he added, "wanted to be able to spit a mile."

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Pat Randall 1 year, 2 months ago

Back to Walmart and the other grocery stores. I went into Basha's about two weeks ago and ordered a case of coffee. It was on a Thursday and they told me it would be in on Monday and they would call me. I never got a call so went in yesterday to see what had happened. Went to customer service and no one was behind the counter. Ask one of the cashiers about someone helping me. She called and all the people that were supposed to be behind the counter were in a little side room visiting. One came out finally, ask me in a nasty tone of voice what I wanted. I explained what had happened. I had ordered a case of International Swiss Mocha Latte coffee and no one had called. He informed me Maxwell house had bought them out and they no longer carried it. I told him I had bought some when I was in there and ordered the case. He wanted to argue and be the smart man. I turned, walked down the aisle where the coffee is displayed. Brought back two cans and slammed them down on the counter in front of another customer told him they did carry it and what he could do with his coffee and he should know what the store sells or at least look to see if they have it. So sorry to have broken up his gab fest with his buddies.

No, I did not buy the coffee nor will I ever go back into Basha's. It was one of my uglier days. I don't usually act that way, but it is very hard for me to walk and he is being paid to take care of customers.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 2 months ago

It's a sad thing that good companies like Bashas have to rely on people who seem to care only about themselves. There is nothing worse in retail sales than someone who is rude to a customer. It seems an incredible thing to do. Who else is there to buy company products than the customer?

You should go back and talk to the manager or write to the company. It wasn't Bashas that did you wrong; it was one individual, and they'd like to know about it.

I worked in a retail store for a while. Did quite well. Became assistant manager when that meant something (in my case it meant that they were laying the foundation for my store when I decided that retail sales was not my life). Right now I happen to be writing about the man who owned that chain of stores, and who taught us what retail sales is all about. It will be in a column soon. He was an inspiration. One thing he taught us was that every time we served a customer our goal was to make sure he wanted to come back--and that meant even if we had to tell him that there was another store with another product that was closer to what he needed.

That's right. He actually told us to do that. He didn't want to hear the register ching-ching with a 98 cent sale when he could create a customer for life by dealing honestly and openly with him.

Each of us in the store, though we didn't try to arrange it that way, had customers who would come in and tell another clerk, "That's okay; I'll wait for Tom." Or whoever. What that meant was that we were doing our job, and so the customer had bonded with us, and therefore had bonded with the store.

Working in that store felt good. It felt a lot like the way I felt in the Air force--as though I was part of something more important than me. That's a good feeling.

I happen to be reading Lee Iacocca's autobiography right now. He went to college to study engineering, but decided that sales was for him, not engineering. He worked for Ford for 32 years and finally became president of the company, and when Henry Ford fired him (for no reason; Iacocca says Ford was not right in the head, paranoid, and drinking heavily) it's interesting to read how Iacocca reacted to it. He experienced a deep sense of loss, the kind of thing you might feel when you lose someone you love. Iacocca was that devoted to his work.

Two weeks lter Chrysler hired him as president. That says a lot. Good thing too; they'd have gone under if they hadn't.

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Tom Garrett 1 year, 2 months ago

I learned something from this string. When I put it up I thought we might get a dozen or so comments, but see for yourself: The only subject that has received more comments lately is the sad shooting out in CT, the resulting political hay made over it, and the angry response of people to that.

What does that say?

I think it says that service and courtesy in retail stores is a hot button issue. That makes good sense. Some stores may be doing the exact opposite of what they want to do. They may be using aversion training to chase people away if each time a customer comes through the door they make his experience unpleasant. If aversion therapy can get people to quit smoking, think of what it can to retail sales!

Where does most of our weekly budget money go? Into some cash register. Without us, those cash registers go silent, but there are some places that don't seem to get that.

Price is important, yes. But price isn't everything, is it? Anything we do once or twice a week had better been pleasant or we quit doing it. I have often wondered how a large retail outfit, one that is right at the top, literally Number One in its field, can suddenly go under. I know there are some things that are obvious; for one, it's obvious that when the people at the top start siphoning off too much of the profits it has to mean that money is not going somewhere else, somewhere it is needed. But the one thing that I can see very clearly is that the big ones that became dead ones--Woolco, Gemco, Federated, and the like--all shared one characteristic, a focus on getting stuff out the door, as opposed to a focus on bringing customers back through that door.

In Woolco the focus was so much on profit that they cut back on their checkout lines to the point where I quit going there for that exact reason. They had good prices, and good merchandise, but it was very unpleasant to go there, and knowing that I was going to be mad as hell about the wait in line was just something I no longer could do. Evidently i was not the only one.

So back to two things: One is the original thrust of this string, the long wait iin line behind someone with too many price checks, and the other is what happened to Pat.

What was the reaction of the customer? "I will not go back to that store."

You know something? If people do not come through your front door, there's no point in bothering to unlock it in the morning.

Take the price matching ploy. Nice idea. You don't have to have sales. You don't have to spend money on advertising. You just let the other guys advertise and take advantage of it. But let me ask you this? If the "other guys" are still advertising, is your policy really working? What if this is true? What if you are driving away more people than you are attracting? Sure, you many pull in a penny pincher, and you may sell him a lot of stuff at loss-leader prices, but what's the bottom line? Are you making more money, or less money, as a result?

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