297 Uh-oh! Watch what you say!

Comments

Tom Garrett 9 months, 3 weeks ago

Pass this around.

We're being watched.

Yes. It's true! We are under surveillance. And I have proof.

The day of Big Brother has arrived.

No kidding.

Mum's the word.

PC is in.

"They" are looking over our shoulders.

Everything we say is being monitored--and even edited at times.

How do I know?

I can't guarantee that you will be able to see it for yourself, but it's possible for you to catch it if you are alert. A little something shows up on the screen every once in a while. It lasts only for a short time, and is gone the next time you return to the place where you saw it, but it's very real and very easy to spot if you look for it.

Every once in a while when you post to the forum, especially if you go in and make a change, a warning message will appear on the screen telling you that that what you said has been monitored.

What does it say?

"Your comment has been edited."

I have no absolute proof of it, but it may have something to do with illegals. I say that because the message is preceded by the Spanish exclamation point. Like this:

¡

Look for it; you can't miss it.

You've been warned.

Pass it on....

:-)

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don evans 9 months, 3 weeks ago

Tom, are you familiar with Google Earth Street View? You can go to that web site, then type in a specific address, street hundred block, or intersection. It will give you the ability to look directly at specific residence/business address, and rote the view 360 degrees around from that point on the ground level. You can see what cars are parked in front or the driveways. You can Zoom in the view also. I recently looked at my home on line in this manner. Yes, right here in little old Payson. Scary huh? My place/street was not scanned/video online when I checked about 14 months ago.

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Pat Randall 9 months, 3 weeks ago

Why do you think we all had to go to cable, or some form of being connected to TV. I bought the box for my TV in Mesa when the govt. was offering everyone a $50. refund. Well I could only pick up the local stations in the area so had to hook up to cable. Now why would the govt. offer to refund money to the people who bought the boxes? You bet big brother is watching and listening. Don, when we first got our computer about 10 yrs. ago and had it for about 4 months I typed in my husbands name up in the right hand corner and got a map of Ariz. then Payson then it zoomed in on our house on Campar. Scarey, never put in an address only his first and last name. Are we being paranoid or what?

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 3 weeks ago

Sorry, folks. I was just kidding. I didn't mean to stir up a nest of bees.

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Pat Randall 9 months, 3 weeks ago

Tom, Sure! I have been thinking about this for a long time. Ever since I typed in my husbands name as I put in an earlier post. Why do all the companies want your email and pay bills and automatic pay from your account? I don't put anything on here but my address once in awhile. Not bank records, nor do I ever order anything. Of course I am sure someone on the internet has my credit card number but they didn't get it from me. I change it ever so often. A funny thing happened about a year ago. My bank called and said someone had turned in my credit card. I didn't know I had lost it but as soon as they called I knew where I did. Went to the bank to pick it up. I asked who turned it in and they told me the person wouldn't tell them thier name. Cancelled that one immediately and got a new one. Why would anyone turn it in and not give thier name? Because all you need is the number and you can call anywhere and buy things.

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don evans 9 months, 3 weeks ago

No nest of Bees Tom. Just the plain truth about what our Government has access to and how it can monitor you. Want to get their goat. Create a phony email, like yahoo, google gmail etc. Then address an email to anyone/place you want to pick. (not a friend/relative) In the message box, just type similar words, not a real message that makes sense. Just the words, as example> Patriot, explosives, gun, shoot, conspiracy, jihad, bomb, chemicals, revolution, assassination, militia, Fema camp etc. Then delete the email address after sending it. I guarantee you that email with just some of those words will be flagged, identified, filtered, categorized, and viewed by a government entity analyst. Probably NSA or Homeland Security. Telephone conversations of any interest to the Feds are mostly monitored from Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, AZ. Both International and domestic land line or cell phone conversations.

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 2 weeks ago

I don't doubt it, Don.

There's a fine line between protecting us and monitoring us. From what I can see, reading about the way things are going in this administration, I don't think some people in DC either know--or care--about that difference.

Pat,

That's a scary one! But I can see part of where it all stems from, and that's from the companies that make money by gathering data on us and selling it. The worst of them are the credit monitoring companies. Who's business is it whether someone has a good credit record or a bad one? That is private information. The laws which allow it do you and I no good; they only help lenders, who make far too much profit as it is.

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Don,

I almost got sucked into the Air Force Security Service three times while I was in the Air Force. The first time, I was unaware what I was volunteering for until after I had signed on the dotted line. When I found out what I had actually signed up for, and realized that I was about to become a spook, I did a very sneaky number involving air force regs and manuals that got me out of it. But it was close!

The second time I was serving in Karachi and the Security Service people up in Peshawar somehow got the word about me. You should have seen the recruiting effort! Fortunately, Air Force regs said that I was serving an isolated area tour, had served an isolated area tour overseas before the one I was serving, and there was no way I could be required to enter the SS.

The third time happened after Lolly and I were safely back in the States in California at Travis AFB. I got called up to Personnel by some Chief Master Sergeant who was obviously was not from our base. He did a number on me trying to recruit me. But get this! He would not tell me what it was I was being recruited for! He just said it was a genuine honor to be selected.

I noticed as we were talking that right across my hard record they had stamped BRIGHT BOY in red letters an inch high. Then the light dawned!

I quietly asked, "Hey! What's that stamped on my record?"

"Well...uh, that's the name of the program."

"Kind of an odd name, isn't it?"

"No, it fits it well. Just sign up and you'll see why."

I looked at the paper and saw that I would be signing a waiver of rights I had under Air Force regs. I said no, then I went and looked up the regs. They could have sent me anywhere for as long as they wanted, and it specifically waived all the rights that accrued to me because I had a foreign born wife.

Then--would you believe?--the Base Commander called me up to his office. He really pressured me to sign that waiver, but I told him the simple truth. I was not going to sign anything that would leave my wife and kid alone in a country they had only been in for a couple of months.

He said, "But you're the only man on the base who qualified. It would be a great honor for us to send a man in."

Considering the fact that he was a Major General, I was polite but firm in my no. And the minute I got back to my squadron I called in a favor from a friend in personnel and got transferred elsewhere.

Usually, when we shipped from base to base we carried our records with us, but this time they sent them ahead. When I got there the first thing someone in Personnel asked me is, "What's this big red stamp here?"

I laughed. "Tear that record up. One of my friends in Personnel back at Travis did that for a joke."

He didn't. That %$#@! stamp followed me--and haunted me--until I got a chance to swipe that record one day--which I did.

Go to this link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Air_Force_Security_Service

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don evans 9 months, 2 weeks ago

APS will be selling your electricity consumption use profile to "third parties" once they install your new digital smart meter. That way you can receive even more junk mail advertising and APS makes more money.

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Paul Woods 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Sure sounds like we're all getting "bound, spindled and mutilated."

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Pat Randall 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Don, Go to APS and tell them you don't want a smart meter. I did because of my Pacemaker and what it may do to it. They were very nice and put something on the computer while I was standing there. Now if they put one on my house they will be in big trouble.

How many of you out there signed up for savings cards at Safeway and Basha's and anywhere else they give them to you free? Where do you think that information goes?

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 2 weeks ago

"Where do you think that information goes?"

To the KGB?

Don,

It al started with a company I saw in Ohio when I was there in 1966. It was a very large place, a square windowless unnamed building off the highway between Columbus and the base I was stationed on. I asked three or four people what the hey it was, and finally someone told me it was a place that gathered information on people and sold it to companies. I told him, "Nah! That couldn't be right. The right to privacy is built right into the Bill of Rights.

I wonder?

Could we write a Bill of Wrongs?

And a Bill of Consequences?

Illegal surveillance would be high on my list.

So would anyone caught violating the Bill of Wrongs.

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lisa sieracki 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Good One Tom........I love the Bill of Wrongs!! That would be too good and yet soooooo true!!! :-)

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frederick franz 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Bill of Wrongs: 1 Everyone has the right to do wrong. 2 Everyone has the right to speak any language but English. 3 Everyone has the right to cheat on income tax. 4 Illegal aliens are automatically doing wrong. 5 Illegals and all people have the wrong to be supported by government handouts. 6 No one will be prosecuted for doing the wrong thing! 7 Do the wrong thing...!

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Pat Randall 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Remember folks, all illegals are not dark skinned or come from Mexico. There are many here from Europe.

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 2 weeks ago

Thanks, folks.

Right, Pat. Here's a preview item from next week's "This week at the FBI" where I put up the ten top FBI headlines each week:

"10. Los Angeles: U.S. Immigration Official Named in Federal Indictment That Alleges Bribes Paid to Approve Applications for Citizenship and 'Green Cards.'"

"SANTA ANA, CA—An immigration service officer with U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) was indicted today on federal charges that allege she took thousands of dollars in bribes from three immigrants who were seeking either citizenship or lawful permanent resident status in the United States.

Mai Nhu Nguyen, 47, of Irvine, was charged in a three-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury. The indictment specifically alleges three counts of solicitation and receipt of a bribe by a public official.

Nguyen was arrested on June 6 after allegedly accepting a $2,200 bribe from an immigrant who was seeking United States citizenship.

In addition to the bribe earlier this month, the indictment alleges that Nguyen solicited and took bribes from immigrants in 2011. In one case, Nguyen is accused of taking $1,000 from an immigrant seeking a “green card” and 200 egg rolls from an immigrant seeking citizenship.

Nguyen, who has worked at USCIS’s Santa Ana office for approximately eight years, is an immigration service officer with the power to approve or deny applications for immigration benefits that are submitted by immigrants.

Nguyen is scheduled to be arraigned on the indictment on July 1 in United States District Court in Santa Ana.

An indictment contains allegations that a defendant has committed a crime. Every defendant is presumed to be innocent until proven guilty in court.

Each count of bribery by a public official carries a statutory maximum penalty of 15 years in federal prison."

I love that line that begins with, "Every defendant is presumed...."

It's that kind of comment that gives me confidence in the FBI.

I kinda, sorta like that last line too. "Each count of bribery...."

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 2 weeks ago

"APS will be selling your electricity consumption use profile"

Don,

It occurred to me that everyone--especially you--would like to know about something I ran across over in England 44 years ago.

Here's socialism in action:

One day, not too long after I arrived at RAF Upper Heyford in 1969 and rented a nice little house in a fine old village called Cropredy three miles north of Banbury, I noticed something really odd. We lived on a cul de sac in Cropredy, a town a tenth the size of Payson, and really out of the way. One evening I happened to look out the front window and I saw a small, jet black van stop at the end of the cul de sac where my house stood. To my total disbelief I saw a round direction-finding antenna rotating atop it. It sat there for a minute or two, then turned, slowly rolled down the street with that antenna rotating, and then turned the corner, and was gone.

I don't know if you've seen pictures of them, but that plain, unmarked, jet black van was the image of the ones I had seen in newsreels about Hitler's Germany and Tojo's Japan, in both of which vans swept the streets at night looking for illegal radios listening to news from the free world.

I don't mind telling you it was a scary feeling looking at that thing sitting out there in the night. I wondered what it was, but was so busy getting set up in my new job at RAF Upper Heyford that I soon forgot about it.

Then, one day when after we had moved on-base at RAF Upper Heyford I'm hanged if I didn't see one of the jet black vans moving slowly--about 2 or 3 MPH--through the base housing area. The housing area at RAF Upper Heyford was unique in all the world as far as I know. It sat across the road from the base and was not fenced off from civilians,

This time I asked the guys at work if they knew what the %$#@! things were. Guess what they said?

"They monitor what TV program you're watching."

"Huh?"

"The Brits have to buy a license to watch BBC. If they come by your house and you're watching BBC but have no license you get arrested and fined."

"But what about all the other information they gather that way? About what people are watching?"

"Yeah! What about it!"

That was 44 years ago.

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lisa sieracki 9 months, 1 week ago

Hi.... I just got a letter in the mail today saying APS will be putting a new meter on the house. WHY?? Is this something we need?? Does anyone know? Can we refuse it? There is nothing wrong with the old one. Why does APS have to go to the expense of wasting mail by sending useless letters & a waste of postage, and why waste buying, and the labor installing a new meter when the old one is fine?? I don't get the public waste of money!!

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Tom Garrett 9 months, 1 week ago

Lisa,

The meters are ones that transmit the reading to the company over the wires that bring in the power. They won't need meter readers any more. Some people do not like those meters because they could be used to monitor how much electricity people use at different times of day.

You can refuse it if you have a reason. You may have to pay extra so they can read your meter.

I'm sure someone on the forum knows a lot more about all this than I do.

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don evans 9 months, 1 week ago

Lisa, It's called a "smart meter" (works wireless/digital) Monitors your electric use down to the milliwatt ? 24/7. Yes, you can keep your current analog meter if: 1.You can prove a medical reason exemption from your doctor. You must deliver APS a notarized copy of the medical letter in person to APS. Check with APS to see what THEY consider a valid medical reason exemption. 2. You can opt out with a delivered letter in person to APS or a Certified/return receipt request via mail. (I suggest the in-person method). IF you opt out, you will be charged a one time $75 fee, plus a $30 monthly service charge for having a meter reader come out. (the current method). I have been told Arizona law allows a customer to read their own meter, but I do not know the approval process or how it works. So basically, your financially punished for opting out for a non medical reason. Do a web search for smart meters and you can read all the propaganda for and against. Some medical hazards are claimed from their installation on your home.

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lisa sieracki 9 months, 1 week ago

Thank you for the information. I guess I am being paranoid. But I do not like being monitored that much. Not to mention the new junk mail I will be getting. Why can't they leave things alone. It works.......not to mention people have a job reading the meters. Nothing like sending someone to unemployment once they do away with the Meter Readers. Maybe my metal knee will shock the meter, it will blow out, and they will have to put the old one back in. Laughing at the thought!! Thanks again for the information.

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