No offering of Calculus at the High School

Comments

roy sandoval 7 months, 2 weeks ago

In 2010 Payson High School offered the following nationally certified Advanced Placement classes: Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, U.S. History and English. At one time there were two sections of AP History and two sections of AP Chemistry. There were also at least two AP Scholars, students who had passed at least five AP national exams for college credit. The bottom line is, Advanced Placement classes and the number of students enrolled in them are indicators of the academic health and rigor of a high school. Because they are nationally normed, AP final exams indicate to students, prospective universities and scholarship entities, where a student stands compared to students anywhere else in country. Additionally, research has shown that even if students do not receive college credit from the national tests, those who take two or more AP classes in high school are much more likely to go to college and receive a four year degree. It is a tragedy that the number of AP offerings have been cut, particularly calculus. I submit the creation of a six period day by a former PHS administrator severely damaged the AP (and vocational) programs because this action severely limited the number of available opportunities a students had for certain classes and also limited the time slots to offer classes (some AP and vocational courses take two periods). This should be rectified. Secondly, if the High School is offering classes like STEM science to spur interest in engineering and science, but they are not offering high level math and science courses, it is a waste of teacher FTE's (Full Time Equivalents) because the students will be taking a "hands on" "high interest" class but will be unable cope with the rigors of math and science classes necessary for an advanced degree in engineering or one of the "hard" sciences.

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Pat Randall 7 months, 2 weeks ago

With all the special ed. classes how come there are not advanced classes for smarter students? Why not help the ones that have a chance of higher education? Maybe no teachers smart enough to teach them?

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Kyle Frewin 6 months, 3 weeks ago

In my case Pat, after 23 years of teaching upper level math at PHS, they forced me to go to the middle school. My choice was RCMS or leave. I left.

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Pat Randall 6 months, 3 weeks ago

Kyle, That sounds terrible to me, so sorry. You must have been doing a good job or would not have been kept so long I don't understand why the teachers, principals and anyone else was moved. Does it have anything to do with retirement pay? If they weren't doing their job, fire them. Don't shuffle them and screw up the whole system. Seems the school board and whoever has been making the latest decisions should leave.

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Kyle Frewin 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Thanks Pat. Yes, I had excellent evaluations for 23 years but because I stood up AGAINST some very immoral things at PHS it was easier for admin (not the Board) to move me than deal with the "issues". There were individuals who didn't want to hear others' opinions. You would be shocked at some of the stuff that is/was swept under the carpet. I was told, "Let it go and don't bring it up again." As a Christian and a teacher, I couldn't do that about certain "issues", I'm sure being there so long and having such a "huge salary" (sarcasm intended) had something to do with it as well.

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Pat Randall 6 months, 2 weeks ago

Kyle, Did you go to the board or Supervisor? With my attitude I would have let everyone know what was going on if it was wrong. I probably wouldn't be shocked. I had three grandkids graduate from Payson HS and 2 from the other one that was over in the other building. My mind just went blank and can't think of the name of it. You would be surprised at how much students see and hear and bring home. I could probably tell things that would shock a lot of people.

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Kyle Frewin 6 months, 1 week ago

I went to the Board and at least 3 Board members gave me their full support and were shocked at the forced transfer...however, Brenda Case's decision stood. One Board member (the appointed one) I really don't know, and the other one, the president, well, enough said. It's sad that it's not about teachers teaching and students learning. I hear things are pretty bad and some teachers will be leaving at semester.

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roy sandoval 6 months, 1 week ago

I'm going to go ahead here on Mr. Frewin's behalf. I worked with Mr. Frewin as his principal for five years. I also taught with him many years ago. Additionally, he taught all three of my children. Simply put, he is an excellent math teacher. Many, many students over many years have benefitted from his highly experienced and skilled approach to teaching geometry. Losing Mr. Frewin was a terrible loss for the high school math department and students.
In retrospect, a characteristic I appreciated about Mr. Frewin was that we could disagree about an issue, sometimes vehemently, yet remain committed professionally to helping students achieve. Believe me, we had some heated discussions, yet I could always depend on his instructional competence and he could always trust that I wouldn't "come after him" because we disagreed on an issue. In fact, at times his opposing view on an issue led to our rethinking and revising with the result of an improved version. Was our relationship always warm and fuzzy? No - not always. Was it productive? You bet. In fact, as a leader, you need people with a different perspective to have the courage to bring it to the table (though some leaders refuse to be aware of this). As well, it is important that people feel secure such that they can communicate their opposing view without fear of recrimination.
Bottom line - Mr. Frewin is a good one!

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Kyle Frewin 6 months, 1 week ago

Thanks Mr. Sandoval. The downward spiral of PHS started when PUSD claimed they wanted to cut admin positions and hired a PHS administrator who was unsuccessful in both Pine and at Payson Center for Success. She was unsuccessful with approx 50 students, so...lets make her principal of BOTH PHS and PCS with roughly 900 students. When she finally realized she was in over her head she retired and they hired a person with no principal experience who thought she could do the job without an assistant principal. That was a "one and done" tenure...(but she kept a job at PHS with the same principal salary). Neither of those two were even willing to hear different views on issues and if one had a difference of opinion, they became a target. "Yes" people were valued more than quality teachers. In having that stance they lost teachers and hid many unethical "issues".

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