America’s Most Biblically-Hostile U. S. President

Comments

Pat Randall 2 years, 9 months ago

I don't know how the President has time to go to the bathroom if he has personally done and said all the things in the article. Seems to me maybe the Wallbuilders should be checked out. Everyone has the right to thier own religion and it is no one else's business. Most of what I have read about what has been said about Obama is he is of a different religion than they are. So many Holier than thou people out there attacking other peoples religion and they either have none or don't live it. Think about, Do not Judge. I think the whole article is a bunch of crap. Some parts contradicts the other statements. How many of you out there have called the LDS church a cult? Don't try to deny it. I have been asked by many people in whatever town I have lived in. Payson, Mesa, Gilbert, Winslow, and almost all the other places I have lived when my husband worked on road construction.

Have any of you noticed there is not a Nativity Scene at Town Hall at Chistmas? It may offend someone. Who made that rule?

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Pat Randall 2 years, 9 months ago

Please do go to the Wallbuilders web site and click on About us. Read it all.

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Pat Randall 2 years, 9 months ago

Go to Wikipedia and read about the founder of Wallbuilders.

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don evans 2 years, 9 months ago

Weather or not you like the source of the information, it's all TRUE. Obama wears his mask tight.

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don evans 2 years, 9 months ago

So what's the problem Pat? Doesn't seem much different to me than than precepts of LDS spreading their word and the members who knock on our home doors and what they say and ask. What part is not factual below??? •WallBuilders bills itself as an "organization dedicated to presenting America's forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on the moral, religious, and constitutional foundation on which America was built—a foundation which, in recent years, has been seriously attacked and undermined." •WallBuilders' mission consists of "(1) educating the nation concerning the Godly foundation of our country; (2) providing information to federal, state, and local officials as they develop public policies which reflect Biblical values; and (3) encouraging Christians to be involved in the civic arena." •In this capacity, David Barton has established himself as the Right's pre-eminent "historian" on the religious views of the Founding Fathers and their desire to establish a nation founded on Christian principles.

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Dan Haapala 2 years, 9 months ago

I don't like the current President and make no bones about it, it has nothing to do with his religion, his ethnicity, or even his legal status. I could make a list but there isn't room on this site. That said, our founding fathers remembered a world full of religious intolerance and envisioned a world without it. They took steps to insure that that didn't happen here. The Government can't attack Budism and praise Zeroastrism because under our First ammendment both are protected. Christianity and Judaism are also protected. Islam, Hinduism and every other religion are protected under the first ammendment. The courts have ruled ( I disagree) that Atheism and Agnostics also are protected but I contend they are lack of religion and therefore excluded but my version doesn't count by law. So here is the bottom line. The Government can't make a law that says yes to any religion and they can't make a law that says no to any religion. The Government can't say a non religion's rights are greater then an established religions rights and vice a versa. Freedom under the first ammendment, when it comes to the practice of a religious faith cannot be infringed upon period. The Government has crossed the line, the courts have gotten it wrong and in my opinion it needs to be straightened out. ( personally I wouldn't mind if a court of Christians made the decision but that's just me. ) It will not happen under Obama.

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Pat Randall 2 years, 9 months ago

Thank you Mr. Haapala.

Don Evans ,all the information about the founder of Wallbuilders has the remark after it Undetermined so who ever wrote it doesn't seem to know if it is true or not. I will not argue religion with you.

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don evans 2 years, 9 months ago

I am not argueing religion Pat, but American Historical facts. I know you like facts, You never answered the question what part, if any, in the bullets above, is not factual. As for Wikipedia, , and Snopes, if you think they are not biased in their definitions and how they present or OMIT facts, keep swallowing the Kool Aide. More facts> Americans to this day are inheritors of traditions and ideals passed down from the early Puritan settlers. Early in this century the German sociologist Max Weber wrote a book called The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. Under various rubrics—the Yankee work ethic, for example—those ideas of Weber’s are still with us, and they have their origins in Puritan New England. From the Congregational religion, the Puritans also contributed to our political structure, initiating what became the “New England town meeting,” a still viable form of direct democracy. That localized means of government, WHOSE ORIGINS WERE RELIGIOUS, helped define the way localities in that part of the country are governed to this day. Similarly, in the southern colonies, where the Anglican Church was dominant, the county, or parish, was the basic structure of church rule and therefore also of political rule. Government by county instead of by township or village is still the norm in much of the South. Perhaps the most important legacy of religious attitudes that developed in colonial America was the desire of the colonists not to let religious differences infect the political process as had for so long been the case in Europe. Thus our First Amendment to the Constitution may be traced to colonial times as part of the religious legacy of that era.

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