Payson Woman's Painting Now Part Of Permanent Mda Collection

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An oil painting by Edith Sarraille of Payson has been accepted by the Muscular Dystrophy Association's art collection.

The 4-foot by 4-foot mural, "Mamacita," portrays a girl giving her younger brother a bath in their home in Mexico.

As the girl gently washes the boy's back he reaches playfully for the large kettle of rinsing water that sits next to his sister. Sarraille contrasts soft hues of deep blues and greens with bright red and yellow in the girl's white blouse and sneakers.

Sarraille, 75, has spinal muscular atrophy. Retired from her latest position as a psychiatric technician with the California Mental Health Department, she enjoys painting, writing and spending time with her family.

Sarraille's work has been shown in local juried art shows and galleries. Several of her pieces are exhibited in offices in Payson.

"We're pleased to have this work by Edith Sarraille in the permanent MDA art collection," said MDA Senior Vice President and Executive Director Robert Ross. "Her contribution to our collection will undoubtedly delight all who see it as it travels to galleries and museums as part of special exhibits of the collection. The works by Sarraille and other artists with neuromuscular diseases underscore that physical disabilities cannot diminish creativity."

MDA's permanent art collection currently comprises some 200 works by more than 300 artists ages 2 to 82 and represents 40 states. Each artist is affected by one of the 40 neuromuscular diseases in the MDA program.

Selected art from the collection has been exhibited at the Dallas Museum of Art; Cork Gallery in Lincoln Center and Forbes Magazines in New York; Tucson Museum of Art; Bishop Museum, Honolulu; Fort Lauderdale Museum of Art; Los Angeles Children's Museum, University of California-Berkeley and Fresno Metropolitan Museum; Duluth Art Institute; and the Capital Children's Museum, Washington D.C.

MDA is a voluntary health agency working to defeat 40 neuromuscular diseases.

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