Local Officers Head To Arizona Police Olympics

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A contingent of five local athletes will be among the hundreds of law enforcement officers expected to gather this week in Scottsdale for the 2000 Arizona Police Olympics.


Officers Tom Tieman, Kevin Scully, Jim Eskew and William Carlson are among those entered into the bench press powerlifting category.


Capt. Bill Blank of the sheriff's department has entered the trap and skeet-shooting competition.


Representing the Payson Police Department, Tieman is a veteran of Police Olympics having participated in eight events. He'll enter the 165-weight division with a personal record 285 pounds he recorded last year.


Tieman said he is unsure of whether he'll be able to match his PR because his recent training regimen has been limited.


"I've only been back at it (training) the past five or six weeks," he said.


Like Tieman, Eskew is an old pro to the law Olympics and once was a national bench press record-holder (405 pounds) in his age and weight class.


If Eskew --who'll represent the Gila County Sheriff's Department -- can lift a PR 410 pounds without red-lighting, he'll reclaim his national bench press record.


The standard is now 407 pounds.

Although Scully and Carlson, also of the sheriff's department, will be competing in the Police Olympics for the first time, both are veteran powerlifters.


Originally, former Arizona State University football player Billy Joe Winchester, now a county officer, was expected to participate in the powerlifting. But, because of other commitments, he'll most likely withdraw, he said.


Blank, Gila County's Chief Jailer, enters the Olympics with 26 years of trap and skeet shooting experience.


"He's been shooting shotguns since he was a young man and over the years has received countless awards in the sport," Eskew said.


The Arizona competition, like other state meets around America, serves as a qualifier for the International Police Olympics to be held later this summer in Cocoa Beach, Florida.


The world event, Eskew said, is expected to be the largest police competition ever.

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