Learn About Propositions Before Voting

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In today's issue of the Roundup, you'll find a comprehensive article about Proposition 202 one of the most ambitious growth-management initiatives ever proposed in Arizona.

The argument centers around the proposition's requirement that cities and counties with populations over 2,500 persons develop "growth management plans" to include the drawing of "urban growth boundaries" no larger than necessary to allow 10 years' worth of population growth. Local politicians and developers argue that such a limitation represents an unreasonable infringement on the rights of local communities to determine their own future.

We encourage you to learn all there is about this important issue by reading all you can on Prop. 202, and by attending a special forum next week sponsored by the Rotary Clubs.

The public debate begins at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 24 at the Payson High School auditorium, and begins with a 30-minute overview of all of the ballot propositions.

Then, Roundup publisher Richard Haddad will moderate debates between two-person teams on 202, and on Prop. 301, which proposes a state sales tax increase of six-tenths of one percent to support education. The additional monies raised if Prop. 301 passes would be used for such purposes as correcting existing deficiencies in school buildings, school safety and character education, and increasing teacher salaries.

This important debate is free to the public, and we encourage all concerned voters to attend.

Dyslexia hits editorial page

Sometimes we get so caught up in the passion of what we're trying to say, that the little details get lost in the shuffle. Such was the case with our Friday, the 13th editorial regarding the Cardinals' Stadium initiative. While we strongly urged residents to contact their friends and family in Maricopa County, recommending they support the initiative, it seems we transposed the actual proposition number.

The stadium issue, the one that decides if our Arizona Cardinals will get a home, is actually Prop. 302.

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