Gila Community College Adopts New Logo

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Gila Community College has a brand new logo.

Joe Hock, a Strawberry resident for 30 years, designed the new logo to take first place in a competition sponsored by the college. He won the equivalent of the tuition for a three-credit hour course at GCC plus a $100 allowance for books -- a total of $231.

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Joe Hock submitted the winning design in the logo contest for Gila Community College. The contest was coordinated by Misty Albertsen, coordinator of community education for the Gila Pueblo Campus of GCC.

The new logo, in teal and copper, features two large letter Cs for community college that interlock to create a stylized target design. Inside the two Cs is the word "Gila" in script with the words "Community College" emerging from the bottom of the two C's.

The message that the logo design delivers is that Gila Community College is a necessary component to complete the target and to therefore help individuals achieve their educational goals.

Hock submitted several designs, all computer-generated, and then adapted the winning entry to meet several considerations that needed to be addressed.

"We got into doing some varied fonts and colors," Hock said. "We got carried away for awhile and texturized it, but then we had to drop it down and simplify it a little bit for the stationery and small print."

The design actually incorporates four different fonts, which Hock altered to get the look he wanted. He used Adobe Photoshop to design the logo, a program he learned to use, appropriately enough, by taking a class at the Payson campus of GCC.

"I had taken the Photoshop class from Fran McPeek," he said. "She's my inspiration. She's a very nice lady and a great teacher."

Hock, who owns C.M.S. Deck Sanding & Finishing in Strawberry, has also dabbled in arts and crafts for many years.

"I owned Hot Crockery up there for a number of years," he said. "We had pottery and stained glass -- that sort of stuff."

Now that he's discovered Photoshop, it's become a passion.

"It's the only thing to use as far as I've found," he said. "All the professionals go with it.

"You can spend a lifetime on that program. There are so many tricks, so many neat things to do. It's a wonderful program."

McPeek agrees.

"This is such an enormous program, you never learn it all," McPeek said. "I don't think the people who wrote it know all of it.

"It's huge, and it was created by probably 30 or 40 writers. No one of them could understand it all."

The current focus of Hock's artistic endeavors is digital microphotography.

"I'm exploring succulents and enhancing the colors -- things like that," he said. "I have a studio, a darkroom and a daughter who is graduating from Arizona State University this December in photography.

"Between the two of us we're doing some interesting things. She's a (film) purist and had to have a darkroom. Then she gets down to ASU and it's all digital. It makes it so much easier when you're studying composition."

Hock moved to Tempe from Michigan in 1964, and then to Strawberry in 1974.

The logo design competition, which was open to all Gila County residents, attracted 10 entries.

Misty Albertsen, coordinator of community education for the Gila Pueblo Campus of GCC, said the quality of the entries was outstanding.

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