Boy's Story Saddens Me

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Editor:

As I read your article regarding Brian Langeliers, I feel the need to express my deep sadness and concern as we watch another young, courageous soldier depart to risk their life for a cause that more and more Americans are beginning to question.

I know that any questioning of the war is met with accusations of betraying our troops. But I believe there is no betrayal in wanting to end this waste of precious lives. My husband and I were in San Francisco recently and were given a handout by a local Vietnam Vets organization -- it showed a line of coffins with an arm sticking up and pointing to the coffin in front and the caption read "I died to honor that soldier's death." This is like a gambler continuing a behavior that they know is destructive with the hope that if they keep on doing it long enough, they will hit the big jackpot and it will all be worth it. Do we really believe that some magical day all will be peace and joy in Iraq and we can leave as heroes? As long as the factions there hate their enemies more than they love their citizens and their children, there is nothing that an occupying army can do to bring peace -- we only give them one more reason to continue the violence.

I am reminded of the press conference when Bush was asked if he knew where Osama Bin Laden was hiding and he looked under the table and made a joke about not knowing where he was. Would this have been as humorous if it was his 2 daughters in Afghanistan looking for Osama? And just last week when Bush was asked what Iraq had to do with 9/11 and he answered "Nothing." This is not what the American people, Congress and the troops were told before the war.

We have helped with the recruiting for the radical Muslims by becoming what they had said we were all along -- a government capable of making pre-emptive war and killing innocent Muslims.

Even the moderate Muslims who hated the radical groups before must now be questioning their assessment of us. We now have more enemies and fewer friends than we did before the war. The only winners are the corporations that received no-bid contracts and have been pulling in billions of American tax dollars.

Our young people's lives are too high a price to pay for a booming stock market.

Wendy Trainor, Payson

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