Build A Model Town, Don't Clone Failures

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Editor:

A while back, there was an article in the Payson Roundup titled "Construction Industry Fuels Payson Economy." It stated that 19 percent of sales tax collected comes from this industry. Pardon me. Where does the other 81 percent come from? A sizable part of the economic engine comes from the retirement sector of the community.

The statistics used in this article should be expanded to show the whole story. Also, I wonder how much it costs to provide the necessary services to satisfy these people? Does it cost more than for the average resident?

Construction will always continue in Payson but all we need is local contractors. What we do not need is big money developers or big subdivisions that decimate our attractive forest and stress our water supply and wildlife. We also do not need any kind of elected or hired politicians in this type of situation.

Cosmetic type projects have received, by far, the most consideration of town council and staff. Why is this when there are so many needs of a higher priority? If there are legal ways found to focus on these projects, why aren't there legal ways found to provide for the people's needs first?

Is it possible to elect a mayor and council that would apply pressure on any offending department to take a different position and find ways to alter the direction we're being forced to follow by interpretation of the law?

With proper methods, a model town could have been built instead of a clone of other failures that refused to listen to the common people. Look for success stories to support your actions and there will be no need to spend money to attract business. Natural growth will automatically occur that is a benefit to all involved.

In the new five-year corporate strategic plan they want to "develop and maintain sufficient renewable water supply to support a population of 32,000." What's wrong with this picture? Is this a plan that will improve the quality of life for those here now? We need a council that will tell the staff what is truly needed and direct them to find ways to provide for citizens' actual needs instead of addressing special interest wants.

Give new people a chance to do this because it sure hasn't been done in the past.

Bob and Ed are certainly two good choices.

Jack Jasper, Payson

Editor's note: A follow up article to "Construction Industry Fuels Payson Economy" was published in the Feb. 21 edition of the Roundup. The second article titled, "Retail Vital to Payson Economy" detailed the "other" 81 percent of sales tax generation.

This letter was edited for length.

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