Trust Elected Officials To Make Informed Decisions

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Editor:

In recent editorials and comments there has been a tone that elected officials are expected to make decisions on what the respondents to a survey indicate is their preference.

Is this why we elect individuals to act in our behalf? Does each of us believe that we are fully knowledgeable on every subject that we could make the decisions that are in our best interest? If we expect our elected officials to simply vote based on a survey, would it not be prudent that everyone's input be considered? If all that was required was to add up the surveys then why do we care who gets elected?

As if I am not busy enough with trying to make the decisions that are required on a daily basis for my own job, I am now supposed to make the decisions for the elected officials to whom I have entrusted certain responsibilities. Of course, if I am going to do their job, I guess I haven't entrusted them with much.

Since we do not have a pure democracy in the United States, we elect others to act in our behalf. We elect these people based on what they stated was their platform during their campaign. If the majority of the voting public agreed with the platform then it stands to reason that the candidate who professes that platform will be elected. Once they are elected we expect them to make the day to day decisions that follow their stated platform.

So, what is expected?

I expect my elected officials to maintain or improve the quality of life that is shared by the majority those who elected them. In addition, I expect my elected official to take whatever action he/she deems appropriate to meet that expectation regardless of weather I agree with a particular strategy. In my life, I have observed that there are many ways to achieve an objective. I am counting on my elected official to meet the objective even if I don't agree with the method that he/she used to do it, as long as it is legal.

Maybe we would all be better off if we spent more time helping to achieve an objective instead of focusing on the strategy of how to reach that objective.

Richard Meyer, Payson

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