Get Spooked, But Stay Safe


Brad Guyton gets to experience make-believe medieval torture, as fellow students clamp him in stocks and walk away. It’s all part of the fun that will be taking place at the Ox Bow Saloon when it turns into a haunted house for Halloween, courtesy of the Payson High School Theatre Troupe. The haunted house and Trunk or Treat event will be on Main Street Saturday.

Brad Guyton gets to experience make-believe medieval torture, as fellow students clamp him in stocks and walk away. It’s all part of the fun that will be taking place at the Ox Bow Saloon when it turns into a haunted house for Halloween, courtesy of the Payson High School Theatre Troupe. The haunted house and Trunk or Treat event will be on Main Street Saturday. |

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There are a number of different ways to get spooked this Halloween night.

One of the scariest and most fun is the haunted house at the Oxbow Saloon.

For weeks, Payson High School drama students have been perfecting their ghoulish looks and designing ghostly sets from the Egyptian times to modern séances. All are sure to frighten everyone.

For parents worried about bringing their children through the haunted house, the scare factor will be adjusted depending on the age of the little ones going through.

In front of the Oxbow on Main Street, cars and booths will be set up for Trunk or Treat, a annual event where candy is handed out.

Attending Trunk or Treat is free, but admission to the haunted house is $3 per person or $2 plus one can of food. Events run from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday night.

The Department of Public Safety, AAA and the Red Cross remind parents and trick-or-treaters to exercise common sense on this evening of fun.

DPS suggests wearing costumes that are visible from the street and that do not restrict children’s movements or vision. Everyone should bring flashlights and should not assume approaching drivers see them. Children should never enter a home to receive treats or stay in the entry for more than two minutes.

If you are welcoming ghosts and goblins, make sure your outdoor lights are on and place pets in the backyard.

With the H1N1 flu widespread, the Red Cross recommends keeping sick children home.

“This will be disappointing to your young one, but your neighbors and community are counting on you to hold the line on transmission of this virus,” a press release from the Red Cross states.

If you are giving out candy, hand it out or scoop it. Instead of a bowl of candy, consider handing out small, individually wrapped bags of treats.

AAA reminds revelers that there is an expected increase of trick-or-treating children as well as adult partygoers throughout the entire weekend, with Halloween falling on Saturday.

Last year, half of all traffic fatalities on Halloween night involved a driver with a blood-alcohol content of 0.08 or higher, and motor vehicle fatalities increase an average of 40 percent when Halloween is on a weekend, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports.

As a result, AAA said partygoers should designate a sober driver before enjoying the festivities. They also recommend avoid driving through residential areas where children will likely be. Party hosts should offer alcohol-free beverages for designated drivers, and prepare a list of taxi companies in advance to have ready should guests need to call one.

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