Stop Muscle Loss Due To Aging

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DEAR DR. DONOHUE: Can I reverse sarcopenia, or just slow it down? What I would like to know is what can I do for my thighs? How often should I do it? And I’d like something for my stomach. — J.H.

ANSWER: For readers: Sarcopenia is muscle shrinkage that comes with age.

Weightlifting stops the wasting away of muscles and builds them up. Older people are not going to develop the same muscle size that a 20-year-old can, but they can see a marked improvement in their strength and an increase in muscle size through weightlifting.

For your specific thigh problem, the squat is a good exercise. From the standing position, you bend your knees until your thighs are parallel to the ground. You don’t have to touch your heels with your buttocks. Lower yourself only to the position I mentioned. Farther than that can hurt the knees.

Start out doing the exercise with no additional weight. Your body weight is enough at first. As you gain experience and strength, you can use additional weight, either a barbell supported behind your neck and on your shoulders, or you can hold on to weights. When you start using weights, exercise three times a week with a full day’s rest between exercise sessions.

For your abdomen, the bicycle maneuver is one of the best exercises. Lie on the floor and raise your legs straight up. Then bend the knees to a right angle so your lower legs are parallel to the floor. Now start pedaling as though you were riding a bike.

Readers interested in starting an exercise program can obtain the booklet on exercise by writing to: Dr. Donohue — No. 1301W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. Enclose a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6 Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: When you and others tell people to walk for exercise, exactly what does that mean in terms of speed? — L.M.

ANSWER: The ideal walking speed is 3 to 3.5 miles an hour or 1 mile in 17 to 20 minutes. If that’s too fast a pace for you, walk at a speed you can maintain for at least 10 minutes. Every week, try to increase the tempo and the time spent walking.

The ultimate goal is to walk for 30 minutes every day of the week — if possible.


DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I’m 61, and I don’t take medicines. I feel good. I have been exercising for two years. I would like to increase my activity. What’s considered a safe way to do so? — L.P.

ANSWER: Follow the 10 percent rule. It’s safe to increase exercise by 10 percent each week. Increase means increasing exercise speed, exercise duration, the number of repetitions you lift a weight or the number of pounds you lift. Don’t increase all aspects. Take one at a time. If you jog, increase either the distance or the time by 10 percent. One week make it distance; the next, speed.


Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer individual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

© 2011 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved

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