Humane Society Protects Our Frayed Humanity

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I care not much for a man’s religion whose dog and cat are not the better for it. — Abraham Lincoln

God bless the beasts — and the Humane Society.

Plus anyone who cares enough to couple a good cause and a good time — by buying a ticket to the Humane Society of Central Arizona’s big June 4 fund-raiser in Rye.

The dedicated people at the Humane Society are on a roll, of late.

After years of heroic struggle, they’ve raised enough money to build a new animal shelter, which will bless and shelter thousands of abandoned dogs and cats in the years to come.

The selfless, great-hearted effort of the Humane Society to provide compassionate care for abandoned and neglected pets not only protects the health of this human community, but safeguards our claim to humanity as well.

The evidence coded into the DNA of both humans and dogs and confirmed by ancient bones suggests that from the first moment Homo sapiens set out on our epic quest to populate a planet, dogs have trotted along at our sides.

The coiled testimony of our DNA suggests that all modern humans set out from Africa to spread across the world some 100,000 years ago.

As it happens, the DNA coil in every single dog and the eloquent testimony of the fossils date the ancient alliance between dogs and humans at about that same moment.

Now, perhaps it is coincidence that dogs and humans struck up their intimate and inexplicable partnership just as human beings set out on their epic journey.

On the other hand, perhaps their help on the hunt and their even deeper lessons in love and humanity played an essential part in our saga.

In any case, dogs and then cats, have traveled with us this long way. If they do not love us, then we might as well abandon any effort to define the term.

So now on the one hand, we can see our best and truest selves in the care and compassion that human beings like those staging “Reds, Whites, Bronzes and Bluegrass” lavish on these creatures so devoted to us and dependent on our whims.

But on the other hand, the cruelty and indifference of the human beings whose careless treatment of these same creatures expresses our great and tragic failing.

But then — that’s the thing about people. We’re flawed and frail, but also full of hope and good intention.

So we hope that you’ll make a donation — if not a $100 ticket to the event, then maybe a gift card for dog food or a bag of aluminum cans dropped by the shelter at 812 S. McLane Road. The Humane Society is working now on the new animal shelter, but relies month in and month out on the generosity of human beings who have learned the exquisite loyalty of the most homely of mutts.

Every day, we choose sides in the battle to perfect our natures and to rise to the challenge of our long and complex history.

So visit the Humane Society’s Web site at www.humansocietycentralaz.org or call (928) 474-5590.

Our faithful companions have come with us all this way, through all our eons, across all this distance. Pay the debt now — and claim your humanity.

It is just like man’s vanity and impertinence to call an animal dumb because it is dumb to his dull perceptions. — Mark Twain

Aero Fair takes wing

Once again, the volunteers and community boosters who have poured their heart and soul into the Payson Airport have demonstrated their affection and support for this community.

The Aero Fair last weekend was a resounding success, drawing hundreds of visitors and giving wings to the imaginations of a fresh generation of children.

Many local pilots donated their time, airplanes and even costly gasoline to give folks a breathtaking, $25 airplane ride. The flights over the stirring scenery of Rim Country no doubt gave a lift to many dreams — and adolescent fantasies.

The good folks who keep the airport running have once again contributed in full measure to the charms of our beloved community — not just for the mail sacks, tourist collars and special deliveries — but by taking the time to share a dream with strangers.

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