Firing Of Town Employee Was A Bad Decision

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Editor:

Having attended the Payson Town Council hearing concerning the firing of Tonia Erin I would like to offer my observations.

It appears that the town manager’s paranoia over her past actions and possible lawsuits was the determining factor and not whether Ms. Erin had actually done anything wrong. Judge McDaniel recommended full reinstatement, yet the council voted to support a highly questionable and, I believe, unethical decision to fire someone without any supporting evidence. It was clearly stated by experts in the town’s operating systems that the error messages generated by Ms. Erin could have appeared for a multitude of reasons and offered no proof that she attempted to enter Ms. Galbraith’s e-mail account.

My understanding is that all of Ms. Galbraith’s e-mails are public property as she supposedly works for us.

It was extremely depressing to note that the council members, who blatantly disregarded the judge, didn’t even bother to ask questions of Ms. Galbraith.

So here are my questions to her:

Why would you fire someone based on false evidence presented by another employee whose motives are questionable at best? After hearing the evidence presented before Judge McDaniel, why didn’t you do the right thing and admit your mistake?

What kind of atmosphere have you created for our hardworking loyal town employees by firing a dedicated, responsible and highly effective person who in eight years has received nothing but glowing and positive reviews from all her supervisors? How can you justify such an action when there is absolutely no evidence to support your claims?

In closing, my final question is to the members of the council who voted to support Ms. Galbraith. How can we possibly have any faith in your decision making when you totally disregard the advice of Judge McDaniel, the obvious lack of evidence and common sense to support a bad decision?

Kathy Clinebell

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