Solving One Of Life’S Mysteries

How to cut a mango (And what then?)

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Mangos are the most widely consumed fruit in the world, yet some consumers shy away from buying a whole mango because they are unsure how to cut it. Don’t let this cutting mystery stop you. It is as easy as 1, 2, 3!

Choose slightly firm mangos with a sweet aroma, and avoid any with sticky sap on the skin. Don’t focus on the color as mangos come in red, green, and yellow with many showing more than one color. Whole mangos should be stored at room temperature for one to two days, and cut mangos can be stored in the refrigerator up to five days.

There are three different ways to cut a mango, but all are easy-to-do. A mango has one long, flat seed in the middle. Once you learn to cut around that, the rest is easy.

• Slice and Scoop Method — Stand the mango on a cutting board stem end down and hold. Place the cutting knife about 1/4-inch from the widest centerline and cut down through the mango. Flip the mango around and repeat on the other side. The resulting ovals of mango are known as the “cheeks” — what’s left in the middle is mostly mango seed. Cut parallel slices into the mango flesh, being careful not to cut through the skin. Scoop out the mango slices using a large spoon.

• Inside Out Cutting Method — Stand the mango on a cutting board stem end down and hold. Place the cutting knife about 1/4-inch from the widest centerline and cut down through the mango. Flip the mango around and repeat on the other side. Cut parallel slices into the mango flesh, being careful not to cut through the skin. Turn the mango a quarter rotation and cut another set of parallel slices to make a checkerboard pattern. Turn the scored mango inside out by pushing the skin up from underneath. Scrape the mango chunks off of the skin, using a knife or spoon.

• Mango Splitter (purchased from a kitchen supply store) — Stand the mango on a cutting board stem end down and hold. Center the mango splitter above the mango, with the opening in the splitter aligned with the widest part of the mango. Firmly push down to separate the mango flesh from the seed. Use the “Slice and Scoop” or “Inside Out” method to separate the mango from the skin.

The mystery of how to cut a mango is solved! A variety of mango recipes, as well as selection and storage videos can be found on the Fruits & Veggies — More Matters Web site.

In the mood for some “island time”? Try this Kiwi-fruit-Mango Salsa and enjoy the sweet taste of the tropics.

Kiwifruit-Mango Salsa 

The sweet taste of the tropics livens up this satisfying salsa.

This is one of our own Fruits & Veggies — More Matters® recipes. It meets the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s strict nutrition guidelines as a healthy recipe.

Preparation time: less than 15 minutes; serves three

3 medium kiwifruit

3/4 cups mango, peeled and chopped

1 tablespoon green chile peppers, minced

2 tablespoons lime juice, fresh

1-1/2 teaspoons honey

3 tablespoons cilantro

1/8 teaspoon salt

3 ounces tortilla chips (1 oz. per serving)

Peel the kiwifruit, cut lengthwise into quarters, then slice. Put the kiwifruit into a medium bowl and add all the remaining ingredients except the tortilla chips. Mix gently. Serve with tortilla chips or over cooked fish or chicken.

Credit: Recipe was developed for Produce for Better Health Foundation (PBH) by Chef Mark Goodwin, CEC, CNC. This recipe meets PBH and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) nutrition standards that maintain fruits and vegetables as healthy foods.

Produce for Better Health Foundation is a non-profit 501 (c) (3) fruit and vegetable education foundation.

Since 1991, PBH has worked to motivate people to eat more fruits and vegetables to improve public health. PBH achieves success through industry and government collaboration, first with the “5 A Day” program and now with the “Fruits & Veggies — More Matters” public health initiative. Fruits & Veggies — More Matters is the nation’s largest public-private, fruit and vegetable nutrition education initiative with Fruit and Vegetable Nutrition Coordinators in each state, territory and the military. To learn more, visit www.PBHFoundation.org and www.FruitsandVeggiesMoreMatters.org.

PBH is also a member and co-chair with Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) of the National Fruit & Vegetable Alliance (NFVA), consisting of government agencies, non-profit organizations, and industry working to collaboratively and synergistically achieve increased nationwide access and demand for all forms of fruits and vegetables for improved public health. To learn more, visit www.NFVA.org.

More with mangos

Warm-weather entertaining calls for light, refreshing recipes full of flavor. These delectable dishes pair mangos and California Almonds for a main course, side dish and dessert that will have your guests clamoring for more.

The naturally sweet, refreshing taste of mango makes every dish special, and mangos serve up more than 20 different vitamins and minerals. Their exotic but versatile flavor and year-round availability make them a go-to ingredient for any kind of entertaining.

California Almonds in all their forms provide a delicious depth of flavor and crunch that complement any dish. Whether whole, sliced, slivered, or as almond milk or butter, almonds add a sudden sophistication and tempting appeal to a wide variety of cuisines.

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Photo courtesy of Family Features

Almond Crusted Pork with Mango Relish

Almond Crusted Pork with Mango Relish

Makes 6 servings; preparation time: 30 minutes; cooking time: 30 minutes

Mango Relish

2 large, ripe mangos, peeled, pitted and diced

1/4 cup minced red onion

1/4 cup minced red bell pepper

1 tablespoon red wine vinegar

1 teaspoon chopped fresh mint

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Almond Crusted Pork

3/4 cup chopped, toasted almonds, divided

2 tablespoons brown sugar

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1 teaspoon ground coriander

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

2 pounds pork tenderloin

1-1/2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

For relish, stir together mangos, onion, bell pepper, vinegar, mint, and salt and pepper in a medium bowl; cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

To prepare pork on grill: Finely chop 1/2 cup almonds and stir in brown sugar and seasonings. Brush pork with oil then season with salt and pepper; roll in almond mixture, pressing into the surface. Transfer to a piece of heavy-duty foil and press any remaining nuts onto the top. Grill over medium heat, turning occasionally to brown each side, for 35 to 40 minutes or until the internal temperature reads 160 degree on a meat thermometer. Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.

To prepare pork in oven: Adjust oven rack to middle position and heat oven to 450 degrees. For the pork, finely chop 1/2 cup almonds. Stir in brown sugar and seasonings; transfer almond mixture to baking sheet. Brush pork with 1-1/2 tablespoons oil then season with salt and pepper; roll in almond mixture, pressing into the surface. Lightly spray pork with olive oil spray. Cook pork on foil-lined baking sheet until exterior is golden brown and meat reaches 160 degrees, 35 to 40 minutes, turning pork halfway through cooking. Let stand for 5 minutes before slicing.

To assemble, top sliced pork with mango relish and toasted almonds.

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Photo courtesy of Family Features

Mango and Almond Custard

Mango and Almond Custard

Makes 6 servings; preparation time: 15 minutes; cooking time: 15 minutes; chill time: at least 3 hours.

3/4 cup sugar

3 tablespoons cornstarch

1/8 teaspoon salt

3 cups half-and-half

4 large egg yolks

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

2 ripe mangoes, peeled, pitted and diced; divided

3/4 cup whipping cream

2 tablespoons powdered sugar

1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

1/2 cup slivered, toasted almonds

In medium saucepan, combine sugar, cornstarch and salt. Whisk in half-and-half and egg yolks. Over medium-high heat, bring mixture to a simmer, whisking constantly. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens, about 2 minutes.

Pour custard through a fine mesh strainer into a medium bowl. Stir in vanilla extract. Cover with plastic wrap, placing plastic wrap directly on surface of custard. Refrigerate, until cooled and set, at least 3 hours.

Meanwhile, puree 1/2 of the diced mango in blender or food processor until smooth, stir into cooled custard. Set aside remaining diced mango.

In another medium bowl, beat cream, powdered sugar and cinnamon until stiff peaks form. Spoon custard into six dessert cups and top with whipped cream, then sprinkle equal amounts of almonds and the reserved diced mango.

photo

Photo courtesy of Family Features

Almond and Mango Couscous Salad

Almond and Mango Couscous Salad

Makes 6 servings; preparation time: 20 minutes; cooking time: about 15 minutes; chill time: at least one hour.

Vinaigrette

3 tablespoons rice vinegar

1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/8 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes

2 cloves garlic, chopped

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Couscous Salad

1 tablespoon olive oil

1-3/4 cups pearl (Israeli) couscous

2 cups water

1 mango, peeled, pitted and diced

1/2 cup sliced green onions

1/2 cup diced red bell pepper

1/2 cup golden raisins

1 cup sliced almonds, toasted

1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese

For vinaigrette: In a small bowl, whisk vinegar, oil, salt, crushed red pepper and garlic until combined. Stir in cilantro and cover and refrigerate until ready to use.

For salad: In a medium saucepan cook couscous for 1 minute in oil over medium-low heat to lightly toast, stirring frequently. Add water and reduce heat to low, and simmer covered for 10 minutes or until liquid is absorbed. Fluff with a fork and let cool slightly.

To assemble, transfer couscous to a large bowl and stir in dressing, mango, green onions, bell pepper and raisins; cover and chill for at least 1 hour. Just before serving, sprinkle with almonds and feta.

Mmmm Mangos

Highlight the exotic flavor of mangos with these tasty ideas:

• When cooking with ripe mangos, try some of these complementary flavors: lime juice, chili powder, garam masala, macadamia nuts, raisins and coconut.

• Grill mangos and serve with a spicy rum glaze alongside a scoop of vanilla ice cream.

Source: Almond Board of California / National Mango Board

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