Low-Cost Spay, Neuter Clinic Coming

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The Humane Society strives to bring fresh, animal-related topics to the Payson community, but we sure do have a passion for good old spay and neuter initiatives.

Adopting or fostering an animal is no doubt a life-altering experience, but spaying and neutering is the solution to the pet overpopulation issue drowning our nation’s shelters. Spaying and neutering prevents unwanted litters and it can honestly save you financially in the long run. When a dog or cat has a litter of puppies or kittens, the cost of initial vaccines and food for the offspring can be quite expensive (vaccines are a necessity for all animals of all ages), but financial loss isn’t the only downfall of leaving your companion animal unaltered.

Animal welfare organizations across the nation are stressing the importance of spaying or neutering your pet. Animal shelters in every state are struggling day to day due to the lack of cage space for the mass of incoming animals. I have worked at several shelters around the U.S. and I have witnessed the horrors of the pet overpopulation problem in our country. There are simply too many animals and not enough homes.

Spaying or neutering your companion animal is not only responsible, but also it saves lives. Let’s use Molly for example. Molly is a three-year-old border collie with the brightest blue merle coat you have ever laid eyes on. Molly’s friendly with everyone in the neighborhood and she loves to run the neighborhood streets to greet fellow neighbors. One day Molly does her usual roundabout of the neighborhood, but this time she’s in season (in heat). Molly’s current unaltered status isn’t a secret either. Unaltered male dogs in the neighborhood are naturally aware that Molly is in heat (male dogs can sense that a female is in heat from several miles away), so Molly’s routine outing results in a litter of eight Border collie puppies.

Molly’s human parents never thought they would be in the situation of raising a litter of puppies, and it’s something they now wish they could have prevented. Now that the pups are weaned and old enough to be separated from Molly, they try to find homes for all of the puppies. Unfortunately Molly’s parents could only find a home for one of the eight puppies. “What do we do now?” Molly’s parents said to each other. With no other options, Molly’s family decides to surrender the remaining puppies to a local shelter.

Molly’s situation is not an isolated case. Puppies flood shelters across the country year-round, but it is easily preventable. HSCAZ is here to help. We understand the financial constraints that this economy has produced, and we can now provide low-cost options for you. HSCAZ has had a dynamic year with controlling the pet overpopulation issue in Payson. We were able to obtain grants which provided targeted areas of Payson with spay and neuter opportunities utilizing generous local veterinarians. HSCAZ also invited a low-cost mobile clinic to the Payson area that provided services to anyone interested in spaying or neutering their pet.

With all of the low-cost spay and neuter options available, why not spay and neuter your pet? Spaying or neutering is beneficial to both you and your pet. HSCAZ is here to announce another spay and neuter opportunity. Another low-cost mobile spay and neuter clinic is coming to Payson for an energetic, two-day event. The clinic is scheduled for March 12 and 13, and it’s quite exciting. Spaying or neutering your pet will provide peace of mind, but also make you part of the solution to the pet overpopulation issue (you can even brag to your friends that you are part of an influential movement)!

If you would like to participate in the low-cost spay and neuter clinic listed above, please come to the shelter to register for the event. HSCAZ is open seven days a week and we will be waiting with open arms. Please don’t miss out on this life-changing opportunity. The surgery list is filling up quickly, so come on in and join the cause!

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Hoss

HOSS

Hoss is a 1-year-old neutered male Catahoula mix. This young chap is a delightful boy, but would do best in an active home.

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Kaysee

KAYSEE 

Kaysee is a 5-year-old neutered male pointer-pit mix. He is a cuddle bug with a heart of gold.

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Willow

WILLOW 

Willow is an 8-month-old spayed female pit mix who loves to cuddle. She would do best in a single-dog home without cats.

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Pretty Girl

PRETTY GIRL 

Pretty Girl is a 3-year-old spayed female shepherd mix. She’s very shy at first, but when she warms up she is your best friend.

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Poppy

POPPY 

Poppy is a 2-year-old spayed female lab mix. She is a cuddle bug and an active young gal.

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Tigger

TIGGER 

Tigger is a 5-month-old neutered male catahoula/shepherd mix. He was so scared when he was found by the police. Totally different dog now, though. He’s outgoing and loves to wear a harness on walks.

To learn more about these or any of the great adoptable pets at our shelter, stop by 812 S. McLane Road, open daily from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., call (928) 474-5590 or go online to www.humanesocietycentralaz.org.

Don’t forget our adoption special. For the month of February, all adoptions are just $25.

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