Health Care Providers Learn New Wound Care


Dr. Patrick Marasco, left, discusses his PulseCare™ Closed Pulse Irrigation™ system with Dr. Alan Michels of Payson, following Marasco’s presentation on the wound care treatment at Payson Care Center June 21.

Dr. Patrick Marasco, left, discusses his PulseCare™ Closed Pulse Irrigation™ system with Dr. Alan Michels of Payson, following Marasco’s presentation on the wound care treatment at Payson Care Center June 21. Photo by Teresa McQuerrey. |

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Caring for large wounds that refuse to heal challenges health care providers and leaves many patients in agony.

Payson Care Center introduced Rim health care professionals to a new, safer way of wound care and one that causes much less stress for patients.

Payson Care hosted Dr. Patrick Marasco for a couple of days the week of June 18. Marasco, a Massachusetts general and plastic surgeon, has created a that system cleans wounds in a contained environment, which is safer for the provider and less painful for the patient. It’s called PulseCare™ Closed Pulse Irrigation™.

Staff members at Payson Care Center were trained in the system and Marasco gave a presentation about it to about three dozen members of the medical community.

“With the amount of diabetes and wound care needed in our community, we thought it would be a great idea for Dr. Marasco to come and speak to the local doctors and health care professionals about the system,” said Christy VanderMolen of Payson Care Center.

Marasco’s system is in use at one of Payson Care’s sister Life Care Centers of America facilities in Medina, Ohio. The facility tried the new method for one patient with a painful open wound after deciding traditional treatment would prove too painful. About six weeks after her admission to the facility, they shifted to Marasco’s system. “Rapid, positive results were noted with … pain and healing,” wrote Jeanne Eshelman of the Medina Life Care Center.

The military has also deployed the CPI system. Marasco said the system works especially well for patients with non-healing open wounds and wounds contaminated or infected with Methacillin Resistant Staph Aureus (MRSA) or other multi-drug resistant bacteria.

Closing the wound also often requires plastic surgery, said Marasco, a doctor for 29 years who continues a general and plastic surgery practice in West Andover, Mass.

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