Yes, We Have No Water

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Editor:

Approximately 10 years ago I bought a piece of property in a beautiful community on the East Verde River. After many weekend trips from the Valley we can now call this home.

Yes, we have no water.

Awhile back, even before driving through our entrance I could see the ominous number 5. Doesn’t get much worse than that.

Yes, we have no water.

I do my part — I go downtown to Walmart and I buy extra bottled water, fill several five-gallon water containers, take my vehicles to the car wash and collect rain water to help water my trees that are now almost mature. This won’t help the trees I put in last year, which are dead and dying.

Yes, we have no water.

I take our laundry to the Laundromat in town and bring the dog to the groomer for a bath and flush only as required.

Yes, we have no water.

In 1971 while on board a ship in the Tonkin Gulf I took military showers, wet, turn off water, soap, turn water back on and rinse. It’s 2012 and once again the military shower is in effect but not on board a ship.

Yes, we have no water.

Properties are for sale, but who will buy when there isn’t enough water? New homes have been built and continue to be built, some quite large; we have a bed and breakfast and weekend rentals.

Yes, we have no water.

Best of all, we have a brand new beautiful monument at the entrance to our beautiful community, stating, “A River Runs Through It.”

Yes, we have no water.

As people attempt to sell their homes or just live their daily lives I wonder why we have this problem? Well permits continue to be issued to build new homes and does anyone believe visitors will be concerned about our water issues. Will we all have to absorb the expense to drill our own well? A water truck pulls up to fill the only storage tank we have. We go from stage 5 to 4 and then we get a half-inch of rain and go to stage 3, how does that work? Did that amount of rain give us that much more water? The powers to be are quick to shut off your water without much explanation, but slow to provide the water we should have. I am quite sure my concern for our water situation has been voiced by others in the past, and I certainly don’t have the answer today. I wonder how many others feel the same as I do and what can we do about it? As I load the back of my pickup with seven evergreens and my seven-foot blue spruce which are now dead and will cost approximately $800 to replace, I wonder — A river runs through it, but a “brook” controls our water. Yes, we have no water (in) East Verde Park.

Lou Manganiello

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