Domestic Violence On The Rise

Payson reports 138 percent jump in just four years, with repeated calls to same addresses

 The map shows the approximate location of reports, scattered all over Payson.

The map shows the approximate location of reports, scattered all over Payson. |

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The graph charts the alarming rise in domestic violence arrests in Payson since 2007, in the face of a significant decline in most other categories of crime.

While most crimes have decreased steadily in recent years, domestic violence cases have risen year after year in Payson.

From 2007 to 2011, domestic violence arrests increased 138 percent.

Police records show abuse isn’t isolated to one area of town or neighborhood.

In the last six months, police responded to 125 addresses for reports of abuse ranging from West Bonita Street to Rim View Road, according to reports the Roundup requested.

Engler said a troubling trend is the number of times police get called to the same address. In half a year, nine addresses accounted for more than 21 percent of calls.

At some homes, police responded nearly every month.

Often the abuse continues because the victim refuses to cooperate with the investigation, he said.

Many times, women stay because they don’t see any way out, especially when they depend on their abuser financially, said Camille Levee, executive director of Time Out, Inc. The weak economy often makes it that much harder for women to gather the resources to leave.

Several women the Roundup spoke with at Time Out’s shelter said financial reasons had stopped them from leaving sooner. One woman said she would likely go back to her abuser because she couldn’t afford to take care of her children on her own.

In a special series, the Roundup will look at why women stay, peek inside the cash-strapped shelter and ask experts to explore possible solutions.

Many blame the slumping economy for rising abuse.

Statistics show the last dip in domestic violence came five years ago.

Since then, things have gone up at an alarming rate.

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