Country Drifting Further And Further Into Socialism

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Editor:

I am writing in response to a letter in this column in last Friday’s (Sept. 7) edition of the Roundup. The writer stated that the people who say that $700 billion would be taken out of Medicare to fund ObamaCare are lying. Maybe not! Their idea was that there would be that much saved by just cutting fraud, etc. The ObamaCare people have been in charge for nearly four years. If it were that easy to save that kind of money on Medicare, why haven’t they done so?

Another thing mentioned in the letter was how great it would be under ObamaCare that children could stay on their parents’ insurance until the age of 26. It seemed to insinuate that this would be without cost to the populace. If so, why not raise the age to 46 or even 66? Heck of a deal! The “free lunch” is back — but some of us still pay.

The letter also stated that the nonpartisan budget committee goes along with the findings regarding the savings to Medicare by cutting fraud, etc. However, the committee uses the data and information they are given. Sort of “garbage in — garbage out.”

It is really sad to see our country drifting further and further into socialism.

I am a registered Independent, not particularly impressed with President George W. Bush, and wish I could have voted for “Give ’em hell Harry” Truman, but was a bit too young.

Dale Thoen

Editor’s Note: The $716 billion in Medicare savings over time included in both the Affordable Care Act and the Republican House Budget mostly represents the phase out of a roughly 12 percent subsidy for private Advantage plans that currently cover 25 percent of Medicare recipients, with additional savings related to eliminating fraud and abuse. Both Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan have in the past supported eliminating the extra payments to the private plans. The Affordable Care Act would use the savings to offset costs related to expanding coverage to an estimated 32 million Americans. Romney wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act, but has offered differing answers on what he would do about the roughly $14 billion annually in extra payments to the Advantage plans.

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