Duran Benefit Features Food, Lots Of Auctions

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Friends say Eddie Duran is recovering from a brain aneurism he suffered weeks ago and while he remains hospitalized in Phoenix, the former Payson Little League coach and board member is anxious to return home.

Those friends, including many of whom he coached Little League teams alongside, are committed to making an upcoming benefit fund-raiser an overwhelming success.

The money earned will be used to defray medical costs the family is incurring.

Organizers have settled on a benefit barbecue, camp-style dinner prepared by Clayton Randall. It will be beef, cowboy beans and all the fixings.

Because Randall is considered one of the finest camp cooks in the Rim Country, the meal is virtually guaranteed to be scrumptious.

The dinner will be served for donations.

The benefit is set for 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 3 at Payson Concrete.

Benefit organizers have also scheduled several raffles including one that has as a prize a full Angus beef, cut, prepared and freezer-ready.

Friends of Eddie’s have also donated seven rifles, which will be raffled.

Tickets for the beef and rifles will be sold for $20 each or six for $100.

Also, an envelope donation containing $1,000 in cash will be raffled. Tickets are $50 each.

Raffle tickets may be purchased at Bud’s Plumbing, Payson Concrete, NAPA Auto and SemStream.

Calculating stats

PHS volleyball coach Arnold Stonebrink can spew stats quicker than a street preacher spouts gospel.

The only problem is, Stonebrink’s statistics are sometimes foreign to fans, boosters and newbies to the sport.

Nonetheless, the coach relies on statistics to monitor progress of the team and individual players. Checking team service percentages as well as individual player percentages helps him evaluate each player and her effectiveness.

Several key statistics determining a serve percentage, all compiled from charts kept by managers or assistants during the games.

A good chart lists each player by name and number and records the number of service attempts, aces, errors and zero serves by each player.

Aces are in-bound serves not returned by opponents, errors are not in-bounds and zero serves are in play after the serve.

Then coaches choose the statistic they want to compute.

Assume Coach Stonebrink is tracking an individual’s service progress. She has 12 service attempts with four aces, one error and the rest are zero serves.

Using that information, he calculates the ace percentage by using the formula (Aces - Errors) / Total Attempts. The player has a 25 percent ace percentage, also called ace efficiency.

Next calculate each player’s serving percentage by using the formulas: (Total Attempts - Service Efficiency) / Total Attempts. Fill in the Lady Longhorn player’s variables: (12 - 0.25) / 12 = 97.9 percent.

Which means she will get the ball in play at least nine of 10 times.

Stonebrink calculates hitting percentage by totaling the number of successful kills and the number of hitting errors. Subtract the number of errors from the number of successful kills, and divide that number by the number of total hitting attempts. A kill is awarded when the other team cannot return an attack, and a player is charged with a hitting error if the ball goes into the net or out of bounds, or if the player is called for a net or line violation.

The coach calculates serve-receive passer rating by determining how many hitters the setter has the option of setting to after receiving the pass.

If the initial pass is played to the setter and the setter cannot successfully set up a teammate for a kill, the passer receives a 0 rating.

The better the pass, the higher the score; passers can receive a 0, 1, 2 or 3, with a 3 being awarded for a perfect pass that enables the setter to set up any of three hitters. You can average out the serve-receive passer rating for each player to help you determine who should play where in your formation.

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