Town Attorney Exploring Run For Superior Court Judge Seat

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Payson Town Attorney Tim Wright this week said he may run for Gila County superior court judge in 2014, a seat currently held by Judge Robert Duber.

Wright said he has formed an exploratory committee to determine the feasibility of running for the division II seat and the community’s response.

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Tim Wright

If he gets a favorable reaction, Wright said he could make a formal announcement of his run after the first of the year.

Wright has worked for the town for several years and before that worked in the Gila County Attorney’s Office. He also held positions in Maricopa County including at the Peoria City prosecutor’s office.

The judge’s seat Wright is seeking holds jurisdiction over a number of areas in Gila County, including cases about title to property, the legality of a tax, felony criminal cases, actions of forcible entry, insolvency, actions to prevent nuisance, probate, divorce, juvenile matters, and naturalization.

Wright said he has a unique judicial philosophy, based on three major areas: justice, mercy and humility.

On justice — “Justice does not start with the end in mind and then back into a conclusion. Justice takes the law, applies the facts, and then comes to a reasoned conclusion.”

On mercy — “There are exceptional cases where the law allows the court to give mercy. These are exceptions, not the rule. They must be exercised with great caution.”

On humility — “The courtroom belongs to the people, not the judge or the lawyers. The judge is entrusted with the courtroom by the people and for the people. The most important people in the courtroom are the people. When the judge loses sight of this, justice is lost.”

Wright said he believes firmly in these principles and “will live them every day he serves as a superior court judge.”

Wright attended ASU’s law school and has lived in Arizona all his life.

Comments

don evans 1 year ago

Yep, it's time for a change. Big Daddy Duber needs to move on and take his ego with him. It is refreshing to hear On humility — “The courtroom belongs to the people, not the judge or the lawyers. The judge is entrusted with the courtroom by the people and for the people. The most important people in the courtroom are the people. When the judge loses sight of this, justice is lost.”

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