Payson Town Hall

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You can fight city hall: Payson council changes traffic plan for development

Homeowner protests convince town council to not complete through street

After hearing from nearly every resident of Forest Park Drive last week, the Payson Town Council agreed not to connect it to a proposed new subdivision. True Life Companies is developing a woodsy community north of Forest Park Drive that includes 150 homes, some single-family and others attached. Plans call for keeping most of the ponderosa pines on the 27 acres, adding a community park, walking paths, sidewalks, streetlights and even a roundabout at Rumsey Drive and McLane, near the library.

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Report shows slight uptick in building permits

We wish we could say it got better, but the number of building permits issued in 2013 indicates things in construction haven’t turned around yet. Not even close.

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Solar panels coming to town hall

The Payson Town Council has approved a new ceiling, not of the debt variety, but solar panels over town hall’s parking lot.

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Highways dominate Payson’s future

General Plan update ponders impact of frontage on growth

Payson remains a prisoner of the state highway, which generates most of the traffic accidents, congestion and sales tax revenue that pays for police, fire and other town services.

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Payson homeowners - small property tax increase

The Payson Town Council says residents should expect to see only a minor increase in their property tax bill this year, at least on payments owed to the town.

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Payson: More cops, no fire marshal

Payson employees in July will get their first raise in four years and the number of police officers in town will increase by five, but the just-adopted town budget otherwise looks pretty tight — including the elimination of the fire marshal’s position.

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Payson to raise property tax

As local districts ponder raising their property tax rates to bolster sagging budgets, Payson will discuss raising its rate Thursday.

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Payson codes contradictory, outdated

When a citizen asked the Payson Town Council why it wasn’t enforcing part of its tree code in April, Town Attorney Tim Wright realized the elderly ordinance was virtually unenforceable — and so were a host of other sections in the town code

Rim Country’s recovery continues to lag behind state

Payson’s economy continues to lag well behind the state and the nation, according to the May financial tracking report released by the town.

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‘Scared to death’

Mayor worried about impact of state sales tax changes

Payson Mayor Kenny Evans says he’s “scared to death” about the town’s budget prospects, especially with a proposed state overhaul of the sales tax still unresolved.

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Payson confirms fire marshal cut

The Payson Town Council Tuesday confirmed budget plans to eliminate the fire marshal’s job, but restored funding for the fire reserves.

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Rim Country jobs: Bruised, battered — still hurting

No wonder we’re hurting. The consultant’s report prepared for the overhaul of Payson’s General Plan has finally put numbers to the region’s economic struggles in the past four years.

APS smart meters frighten protesters

Health effects, government eavesdropping spook crowd

A crush of people alarmed about the imminent installation of “smart meters” crowded the Payson Town Council meeting last week, hoping to convince the town to pass a resolution opposing the automated transmitters that intermittently send information on electricity use to Arizona Public Service.

New ‘milestones’ in land purchase

But costs, delays spur talk of alternatives to FS site

They want to sell us the land. Really. Badly — just not quickly. That’s the mixed message that emerged about the Rim Country Educational Alliance’s struggle to buy 260 acres of land from the U.S. Forest Service for a 6,000-student university campus and various spinoff facilities.

Public pays dearly for copies of public records

Officials charge $8 for report, citing law requiring ‘reasonable’ charges for copies of public documents

Should a citizen have pay $8 to make a copy of a two-page police report? Sounds outrageous, but agencies across the county and the state are charging more and more for copies of public records.

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