roy sandoval

Payson, Arizona

roy sandoval 4 months, 3 weeks ago on Newspaper Coverage Lacking

Special-Called Meeting Monday, December 2, 2013 5:30 PM District Office Board Room, 902 W. Main Street, Payson, AZ I. APPROVAL OF AGENDA
II. EXECUTIVE SESSION Executive session to discuss and consult with the District’s attorney for legal advice and to consider the District's position and instruct its attorney regarding the Superintendent's contract in accordance with A.R.S. Section 38-431.03(A)(3) & (4).

(Read Prior to Executive Session) All persons present are hereby reminded that it is unlawful to disclose or otherwise divulge to any person who is not now present, other than a current member of the Board, anything that has transpired or has been discussed during this executive session. To do so is a violation of A.R.S. §38-431.03 A.2, A.3. unless pursuant to a specific statutory exception.

Reconvene in Open Session

III. EXECUTIVE SESSION Executive session to discuss and consider the Superintendent's employment and resignation in accordance with A.R.S. Section 38-431.03(A)(1).

(Read Prior to Executive Session) All persons present are hereby reminded that it is unlawful to disclose or otherwise divulge to any person who is not now present, other than a current member of the Board, anything that has transpired or has been discussed during this executive session. To do so is a violation of A.R.S. §38-431.03 A.2, A.3. unless pursuant to a specific statutory exception.

Reconvene in Open Session

IV. ACTION ITEMS
A. Discussion and Possible Action on Superintendent's Resignation and Separation Agreement B. Discussion and Possible Action on Search for Interim Superintendent V. ADJOURN

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roy sandoval 4 months, 4 weeks ago on Newspaper Coverage Lacking

John, I don't know, but it sure seems like they could use a little good news, meaning authentic good news. I noticed special executive session for last Wednesday (20th) with the agenda as, "Executive session to discuss and consult with the District’s attorney for legal advice regarding administrator’s position/assignment in accordance with A.R.S. Section 38-431.03(A)(3)." This was actually the second special bd. meeting, executive session with the same agenda label in a week. The prior was on November 14th Usually these mean that an administrator is being terminated, disciplined or has some type of formal grievance. Additionally, two in a row like this, most likely indicates that they either don't know what to do, or cannot get on the same page, or the process is so complicated that they asked the attorney to research it and give them alternative plans.

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roy sandoval 5 months, 1 week ago on 487 Ron Hitchcok's resignation: Gain or loss?

Tom, I come into contact with many Superintendents and former Superintendents from large and small districts. Some have been Sups. in both large and small. If you visit with them they will tell you, a smaller district presents many challenges simply because you do not have the layers of protection surrounding you. You are readily accessible and you are center stage in everything education for that community. If you are the Sup. in Mesa you have a fleet of Assistant Superintendents, and Area Directors, plus a full time Public Relations/media Director surrounding you. You are not readily accessible. I am not implying here that the job is any easier. I am saying however, that if you are the Sup. in a small town you are - exposed. As well, the policies, procedures, laws, budgets etc. are still the same.

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roy sandoval 5 months, 1 week ago on 487 Ron Hitchcok's resignation: Gain or loss?

Gain or loss? Here is the timeline: The last Superintendent, O'Brien resigns in January of 2012 after having been a finalist in April 2011 at Deer Valley for Superintendent and a finalist in May 2010 at Roosevelt for Superintendent. The Board pays a significant sum, probably around $9000 to do a national search for a new Superintendent for PUSD. They create a description of what and who they are looking for, including their goals etc. By March they have gotten it down to 5 candidates. The candidates come to Payson for a public forum, but also tours of schools and time with the Board. The board interviews the candidates and decides on the finalists. They make a final decision on Mr. Hitchcock. Mr. Hitchcock begins to come to Payson early, before his contract actually starts, so he can be somewhat briefed by the O'Brien and get to the know the board members and they can get to know him etc. His contract begins July 1, 2012. A short sixteen months later he resigns. While all of this is going on from March 2010 to November 2013, Six different principals either come or go or are changed, four athletic directors change, etc. etc. It sounds to me like the great loss here is to the credibility of Payson Unified School District. Any business or school depends a great deal on reputation. What is the reputation around the state for PUSD at the present time? My question would be, was the PUSD presented to Mr. Hitchcock when he was being courted and called (Remember, he was chosen from a national search) the same as the PUSD he found once he was here? If Mr. Hitchcock's resignation is accepted, believe me, he will go on and be fine. In fact he will thrive. Many of us who have left PUSD over the last few years, have thrived. I think you may need to rethink or rephrase the question, "Hitchcock leaving: How does this affect the credibility and reputation of PUSD." Further, you may want to ask, "How will this incident affect voter attitudes toward the district in the the upcoming budget override election?"
These may not be popular thoughts or questions. However, they are certainly valid given the tumult and instability over the last three and a half years. Now my opinion: Has it been good for kids - No.

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roy sandoval 5 months, 3 weeks ago on Blue Ridge rolls past Longhorns 63-6

Well, just so you know; though it may go down as one of the worst losses in PHS football history. It is not THE worst. Not by a long shot. In the fall of 1973, Terry Nodlinski (now in the AZ coaching hall of fame) took over as head coach of the Longhorn football program. I was a freshman, 126 lbs. defensive back. We lost to Round Valley that year on a bright sunshiny Saturday afternoon (pre RV dome) 80-0. Yes - 80 to 0. We were 0-9-1 that year. Three years later we were in the state football finals. So boys - work hard, lift like madmen - like there is no tomorrow, listen to your coaches, commit yourself to academic and athletic excellence, be willing to sacrifice - and you CAN turn it around. But - It won't be easy and it won't be painless so work hard! Best of luck.

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roy sandoval 6 months, 2 weeks ago on No offering of Calculus at the High School

I'm going to go ahead here on Mr. Frewin's behalf. I worked with Mr. Frewin as his principal for five years. I also taught with him many years ago. Additionally, he taught all three of my children. Simply put, he is an excellent math teacher. Many, many students over many years have benefitted from his highly experienced and skilled approach to teaching geometry. Losing Mr. Frewin was a terrible loss for the high school math department and students.
In retrospect, a characteristic I appreciated about Mr. Frewin was that we could disagree about an issue, sometimes vehemently, yet remain committed professionally to helping students achieve. Believe me, we had some heated discussions, yet I could always depend on his instructional competence and he could always trust that I wouldn't "come after him" because we disagreed on an issue. In fact, at times his opposing view on an issue led to our rethinking and revising with the result of an improved version. Was our relationship always warm and fuzzy? No - not always. Was it productive? You bet. In fact, as a leader, you need people with a different perspective to have the courage to bring it to the table (though some leaders refuse to be aware of this). As well, it is important that people feel secure such that they can communicate their opposing view without fear of recrimination.
Bottom line - Mr. Frewin is a good one!

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roy sandoval 6 months, 3 weeks ago on Student achievement teachers hail gains

Pat, I would respectfully ask you not to judge a book by its cover. Wayne is one of the finest educators ever to come to Payson. He has high standards for his students and high academic standards for himself and his family. Wayne's son Aspen came through the Payson School system. Aspen now has a PhD in economics from the University of Chicago. He is a world class academician. HIs son Cypress is on the same high academic trajectory while also maintaining his status as a true "World Class" athlete. These young men have honored their parents Wayne and Gail and this community of Payson. Wayne's high academic standards have made tremendous contributions to countless students who have passed through the Payson School system. When he was the PHS debate coach, his teams were literally nationally ranked and recognized. As well, in the realm of extra-curricular and community endeavors he has put on numerous bicycle activities for kids including safety and competitive mountain biking.
It is simply a truth, corroborated by a twenty years of actively and selflessly engaging with young people that Wayne Gorry represents the finest anywhere. I not only take him seriously, I am honored to call him a colleague and a friend. I hope you have the opportunity to visit with him some day.

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roy sandoval 7 months, 2 weeks ago on No offering of Calculus at the High School

In 2010 Payson High School offered the following nationally certified Advanced Placement classes: Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, U.S. History and English. At one time there were two sections of AP History and two sections of AP Chemistry. There were also at least two AP Scholars, students who had passed at least five AP national exams for college credit. The bottom line is, Advanced Placement classes and the number of students enrolled in them are indicators of the academic health and rigor of a high school. Because they are nationally normed, AP final exams indicate to students, prospective universities and scholarship entities, where a student stands compared to students anywhere else in country. Additionally, research has shown that even if students do not receive college credit from the national tests, those who take two or more AP classes in high school are much more likely to go to college and receive a four year degree. It is a tragedy that the number of AP offerings have been cut, particularly calculus. I submit the creation of a six period day by a former PHS administrator severely damaged the AP (and vocational) programs because this action severely limited the number of available opportunities a students had for certain classes and also limited the time slots to offer classes (some AP and vocational courses take two periods). This should be rectified. Secondly, if the High School is offering classes like STEM science to spur interest in engineering and science, but they are not offering high level math and science courses, it is a waste of teacher FTE's (Full Time Equivalents) because the students will be taking a "hands on" "high interest" class but will be unable cope with the rigors of math and science classes necessary for an advanced degree in engineering or one of the "hard" sciences.

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roy sandoval 7 months, 2 weeks ago on Crowded classes

In 2010 Payson High School offered the following nationally certified Advanced Placement classes: Calculus AB, Calculus BC, Biology, Physics, Chemistry, U.S. History and English. At one time there were two sections of AP History and two sections of AP Chemistry. There were also at least two AP Scholars, students who had passed at least five AP national exams for college credit.
The bottom line is, Advanced Placement classes and the number of students enrolled in them are indicators of the academic health and rigor of a high school. Because they are nationally normed, AP final exams indicate to students, prospective universities and scholarship entities, where a student stands compared to students anywhere else in country.
Additionally, research has shown that even if students do not receive college credit from the national tests, those who take two or more AP classes in high school are much more likely to go to college and receive a four year degree. It is a tragedy that the number of AP offerings have been cut, particularly calculus.
I submit the creation of a six period day by a former PHS administrator severely damaged the AP (and vocational) programs because this action severely limited the number of available opportunities a students had for certain classes and also limited the time slots to offer classes (some AP and vocational courses take two periods). This should be rectified. Secondly, if the High School is offering classes like STEM science to spur interest in engineering and science, but they are not offering high level math and science courses, it is a waste of teacher FTE's (Full Time Equivalents) because the students will be taking a "hands on" "high interest" class but will be unable cope with the rigors of math and science classes necessary for an advanced degree in engineering or one of the "hard" sciences.

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roy sandoval 8 months ago on High school sobered by grade drop

These numbers are incorrect. Percentage of Payson High School Sophomores meeting and exceeding in AIMS Reading in 2011 was 75%. Percentage passing reading in 2012 was 79%. The percentage passing the AIMS Spring 2013 was 79%.

In AIMS Writing the percentage meeting or exceeding on the AIMS in 2011 was 68%. The percentage passing the AIMS Writing in 2012 was 69%. The percentage passing AIMS Writing in 2013 was 63%.

Source is from the spreadsheets on the Arizona Department of Education website http://www.azed.gov/research-evaluation/aims-assessment-results/

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