Jack Burns, Social Security Administration

Jack Burns, Social Security Administration’s Southwest area public affairs specialist.

Scammers go to great lengths to trick you out of your personal information. We want to help you protect your information by helping you recognize a Social Security imposter.

There’s a widespread telephone scam involving callers claiming they’re from Social Security. The caller ID may even show a government number. These callers may tell you there’s a problem with your Social Security number. They may also threaten to arrest you unless you pay a fine or fee using gift cards, pre-paid debit cards, a wire transfer, or cash. That call is not from us.

If you receive a suspicious call from someone alleging to be from Social Security:

• Hang up right away.

• Never give your personal information, money, or retail gift cards.

• Report the scam at oig.ssa.gov/ to Social Security’s law enforcement team at the Office of the Inspector General.

Social Security will not:

• Threaten you.

• Tell you that they have suspended your Social Security number.

• Call you to demand an immediate payment.

• Ask you for credit or debit card numbers over the phone.

• Require a specific means of debt repayment, like a prepaid debit card, a retail gift card, or cash.

• Demand that you pay a Social Security debt without the ability to appeal the amount you owe.

• Promise a Social Security benefit approval, or increase, in exchange for information or money.

• Request personal or financial information through email, text messages, or social media.

Social Security will:

• Sometimes call you to confirm you filed for a claim or to discuss other ongoing business you have with them.

• Mail you a letter if there is a problem.

• Mail you a letter if you need to submit payments that will have detailed information about options to make payments and the ability to appeal the decision.

• Use emails, text messages, and social media to provide general information (not personal or financial information) on its programs and services if you have signed up to receive these messages.

Editor’s note: This is happening in Payson. A Roundup reporter had a robocall from a number in Kirkland, Wash., claiming their Social Security number had been suspended because of suspicious activity and was invited to make a return call for further information. To retrieve the number to alert the author of this Social Security article the reporter received a recording saying the number was not a valid phone number.

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